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jeteran

Starting a new game dev career. A 2D game, where should I begin?

9 posts in this topic

Hello guys, 

 

I'm happy to tell you that I'm starting a new game development career as an indie game producer. I had done some games in the past, specially in Flash, but now I want to take this seriously and by that (and because I love since I learn it on my professional career) I want to use C++ as my main code programming.

 

I have worked on many ideas for this game. Searching on the net, I surfed looking for what libraries I could use to make it. The game will be a 2d platform and will have some RPG elements (close to what Castlevania: Symphony of the night has to offer), with a good work on it's narrative. I found out that SFML is the one that can help me achieve it, I'm I right?

 

I also saw that I can use SDL library for the graphics but SFML has some advantages in terms of coding and implementing OOP, what do you think? Or should I use other language? What I don't want is have a good knowledge of a library that at the end wasn't the one capable of doing the work correctly.

 

If I finally decide for SFML, where can I get started? I saw this book on Amazon: SMFL Game Development and also saw there is a good tutorial in Game From Scratch site.

 

What do you think?

 

Even though I have a BS in CS, I lost all the knowledge about OPP and stuff. Where can I go to re-learn all this?

 

Thanks so much for your time!

Edited by JETerán
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I'm starting a new game development career as an indie game producer. ... I want to use C++ as my main code programming.

 

I'm confused. You're going to produce AND program? Or did you just misspeak when you said "producer"?

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I'm starting a new game development career as an indie game producer. ... I want to use C++ as my main code programming.

 

I'm confused. You're going to produce AND program? Or did you just misspeak when you said "producer"?

 

Thanks for your reply Tom.

 

I want to produce the game and develop it. I have some knowledge in producing video games and I will apply it in this one.

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You cannot seriously make games if you are going to struggle with the language too.

Of course, you could do all of this with smaller SFML projects. Two birds one stone etc.

Thanks Kaptein for yor piece of advice.

 

Yes I believe I have to first have a good background of C++ and OPP before making the game I want. What do you think is the best way I can get there? Do you know sites or books I can learn from?

 

Thanks once again man!

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I'm using SDL and C++ for 2d games, the good thing about SDL is that it's very low level (as far as i know about libraries) but at the same time it's easy to work with once you learn the basic functions. Also if later you want to move to something more powerful you can use SDL with OpenGL.
I've made a few games with SDL, nothing very big but i'm sure there are big games made this way. 

A good way to learn SDL is with the LazyFoo tutorials: http://lazyfoo.net/SDL_tutorials/index.php.
As Kaptein said you will need OOP, but i think the best way to learn is to start thinking, designing and coding simple games while you learn OOP, but keeping it simple, if you try to make your dream game from nothing you will probably get frustrated. On the other hand if you keep learning C++ and OOP forever you will never start making games.
But it's just my opinion based on things that happened to me and errors i made.

Good luck!

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About learning OO modelling and programming, I think there's no place more convenient than wikibooks.org.

 

I have been using Angel2D with C++ in the last couple weeks¹ and I am really enjoying it.

I even made a push request² to their git repository!

It is really efficient to develop fast, and you're saying you know C++.

 

Still, I'd also recommend SDL to anyone. It gives you absolute flexibility.

Angel does too, but you'd probably need to edit the code of the engine itself; what they actually encourage!

 

¹ - this is a disclaimer. I may change my mind, even though that is unlikely.

² - 1 line, but it still counts doesn't it? laugh.png

Edited by dejaime
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Hello guys, 

 

I'm happy to tell you that I'm starting a new game development career as an indie game producer. I had done some games in the past, specially in Flash, but now I want to take this seriously and by that (and because I love since I learn it on my professional career) I want to use C++ as my main code programming.

 

Go a step above SFML (or SDL) and find a game engine that abstracts the hardware differences.

 

And now to push one on my projects on you.. Try my Super Play game engine (http://superplay.info/)  to develop a game that doesn't directly relate to the system you are targeting.

 

Super Play supports Windows, Linux, Android, Ouya, GameStick, and iOS by pretending to be a SNES that was created in 2013.

Edited by cdoty
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Thanks very much guys for your answers!

 

 

 


Set small, reasonable goals for yourself or you'll quickly get overwhelmed.

This is totally true, specially if I am starting to learn a new language.

 

 

 


Hopefully you'll find your programming skills returning faster this second time around.

Hope they will, I'm very excited to start this new career!

 

 

 


I have been using Angel2D with C++ in the last couple weeks¹ and I am really enjoying it.

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, I haven't heard of Angel2D, I will research more about it.

 

 

 


Try my Super Play game engine (http://superplay.info/)  to develop a game that doesn't directly relate to the system you are targeting.

Looks really interesting your engine, congrats for your work! Is there a demo I can use?

 

Guys I have being jumping around several libraries and is really hard for me to pick one. How can I know that SFML is the one for me?

 

Wish you people have a great week!

Edited by JETerán
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