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Creamy

How to overcome biggest hurdle - Motivation?

14 posts in this topic

As to me it seems that no motivation is a problem but time, or do i notunderstand? If you got a 5 hours a week you cand do it (is there a problem with motivation to do it?) The trouble is IMO that even doing this 

70 hours a week (as I do, (or almost)) may be not sufficient to doing something finished/polished - it steel needs yet tremendous amount of time (at least in my case when i am going forward but it needs and burns so much time) that is a hurdle

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Motivation is the major issue, time just makes it worse.


Motivation may be problem for you but there are many many people (like me) who ae zero problem with motivation and this grants me nothing when we speaking about results (motivation can be only problem for some and dont think this is 'major' problem, this is just 'tiny' problem 0.001of real major problems )

For me as i said time is the major problem (not only time needed for conducting a game project from beginning to the polished end) but also this time needed to gain experience to the level of being considered somewhat experienced (which is also counted in years)

And even this ('being experienced' - which takes many years of hard work do not grant you that you will conduct a good game* - you steel need to go much further)

*there are many examples on this, may people are experienced but still not created a good noticable game

thought all this path is possible to be taken and travelled but there comes a major problem - time

So for me the time is maybe one and only one realy big problem (on top of all problems), the other can be just solved by reading the google and an amount of patience and logical (+creative etc..) thinking - but the time needed to embrace/take it all is still a dooming problem. Edited by jbadams
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Thankyou everyone, very helpful information. I can definately say I know the feeling of being lazy more often than I should.

 

My biggest problem is probably time and time keeping, I have a lot on my plate and I always end up wondering where the time went and trying to recall what I am up too.

 

Don't have a lot of time today and I need to hit the hay. One thing that was mentioned was finding someone to work on a project with or at least help each other, how many of you have done that and has it been successful?

 

Cheers!

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Wow, some of the comments here are really helpful smile.png .


finding someone to work on a project with or at least help each other, how many of you have done that and has it been successful?

I REALLY believe that's ten times easier to get motivated or take things seriously if you get someone to work with. But  I've had mixed experiences with this.

It's important that the person you're working with  it's at the same level (or close) as you are. I'm talking about knowledge and also motivation or attitude towards the project. I'm in college studying computer science so it's not difficult for me to get a "group of people who want to make games" (i think we all want to tongue.png  ), but  some people just want to show how much they know and how they can do things better than everyone, or on the other side people who don't really want to learn or put effort. That kind of things are even worse in my opinion than trying to code alone, it's hyper demotivating.

I'm actually working with only one friend, that i know it's in the same page as me in this things and that's much better than a bigger group that has guys with big egos.


I can definately say I know the feeling of being lazy more often than I should.

I don't think 'being lazy' is always bad thing, sometimes when i don't feel like coding i just watch a movie or play a game (let's say 2 hours) and after that i can focus and get to work. Sometimes if i try to code when feeling lazy i just keep staring at the code and do nothing for 3 hours, so 2 hours of lazyness and one focused is better than that biggrin.png .

And one last thing, this could seem a little ridiculous but having small rituals can help. For example making a coffee, or move the computer to other place of the house, put some specific kind of music...Sometimes one associates some part of the house with work or with relaxation, for example i can't study in my bedroom so i go to the kitchen.

Good luck!

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Skimming through the replies, I see plenty of good advice/motivations/etc.

 

For me personally, it was/is always a bit the same like going to the gym. I don't feel like going, at all, even though I know it's good for me. But once you're there, it's alright! 

 

Gaining the motivation to start something (and keeping it) probably differs per person and it's something you will need to figure out for yourself. There are of course a lot of common ways to keep/get motivation, so trying out what others do might work fine, or not, or lead you to a way that works for you.

 

One of the things that worked very well for me, is a bit scary, but it greatly helped me in my motivation and even in doing things a bit more right and with more thought in it, was to write about it on a blog. 

I personally wrote some stuff in a tutorial kind of way so it could also serve some good to others and kept me sharp in what I did, because it was/is also important to know what you're actually doing. It doesn't even have to be a tutorial, posting progress on your project will not only give you comparison in how much your project is advancing, but you can also get some (valuable) feedback on it. Just put a link in your signature on related forums or post it in related places. It might not attract hordes of people (or maybe it does, who knows?), but it might just give you that little push in the back when you're looking back at some posts.

 

Also depending on what your aim is, don't let time or other people/your surroundings influence you too much in your demotivation. You will always run into obstacles or obligations that require you to take time off from development. Do it at your own pace. You can probably also structure your time. Allocate some time a week that you dedicate to developing, even if it just an hour. Make sure that you will not get distracted by social networks or watching cats on the internet, create a work environment for yourself.

 

Also take note that an interest isn't always the way you should go. Sometimes an interest is best kept theoretical. Like I love biology and astronomy and I watch/read plenty of stuff about it, but that's as far as I will go on those subjects. Applying biology and astronomy is probably a tad different than game dev related stuff, but it should get the point across.

 

In any way, Give yourself some time to think about what you really want and how you want to do it, there is a lot less pressure if you're doing stuff just as a hobby. And if you find out this is perhaps not your thing, there is not shame in that!

 

Good luck! :)

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