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Sacrimone

Unity3D/Unreal Engine Aficionado(s) Wanted.

8 posts in this topic

Hey everyone. Since this is my first post on the forums, I'll introduce myself.
My real name is Ryan. You can call me Kira if you wish. Many do.

I'll cut straight to the point. I'm looking for people who have experience with Game Design Engines, such as (but not limited to) Unity3D or Unreal Engine (UDK/UE3).
The reason for this is simple. I intend to create a MMOCCG (Massive Multiplayer Online Collectible Card Game) based solely on Anime/Manga and its popular characters. I have the majority of the game structure figured out. However, I'm still new to using engines and the like (which is why I need your help).

P.S. This is an independent project. I intent to publish this game first on the Google Play Store (Android Marketplace) for free. However, there will be many
in-game purchases available. If this becomes a reality and if the game makes any money, I promise to pay whatever I can for your time and effort.
Making money is not at all my goal for this project, so rest assured, your efforts will (probably) not be in vain. smile.png

P.P.S. I have uploaded one card design (keep in mind that it is still a work in progress) to show that I do, indeed, intent to do my part.
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I'm sorry I'm a out of the subject, but if you using characters from existing anime/manga, you will have some copyright issues. I don't think yo can just "steal" other people character to make money.Not entirely sure, but you should check, just to be sure :)

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Recruitment posts are not allowed in the forums. Please post in the classifieds instead.

P.S. As above, using existing characters *is* copyright infringement, and distribution of such a game would be illegal on your part. Recruiting for those kinds of illegal projects is frowned upon in this community.

P.P.S. If you're going to be selling a game, you need to register a business entity, and if you're promising to pay people eventually then you need to be offering contracts to be taken seriously (it's much easier to just not promise money / make freeware).
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I'm sorry I'm a out of the subject, but if you using characters from existing anime/manga, you will have some copyright issues. I don't think yo can just "steal" other people character to make money.Not entirely sure, but you should check, just to be sure smile.png

To my observation "stealing" manga is rather safe. The Japanese companies have a policy of not wasting resources on suing people around, even if it's used commercially (and in my personal opinion it's much wiser policy, since these small games generate more new/renewed fans for the whole genre than the potencial loss of tiny income they might have suffer). I would avoid through titles that are heavily promoted in US/europe (Pokemons/Digimons/etc). And this applies only to manga (to my observation, which might be wrong), try Superman/Batman/Capcom and they will eat you alive :)

 

But yeah, overall I agree, avoid copyright problems.

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I'm sorry I'm a out of the subject, but if you using characters from existing anime/manga, you will have some copyright issues. I don't think yo can just "steal" other people character to make money.Not entirely sure, but you should check, just to be sure smile.png

To my observation "stealing" manga is rather safe. The Japanese companies have a policy of not wasting resources on suing people around, even if it's used commercially (and in my personal opinion it's much wiser policy, since these small games generate more new/renewed fans for the whole genre than the potencial loss of tiny income they might have suffer). I would avoid through titles that are heavily promoted in US/europe (Pokemons/Digimons/etc). And this applies only to manga (to my observation, which might be wrong), try Superman/Batman/Capcom and they will eat you alive smile.png

 

But yeah, overall I agree, avoid copyright problems.

 

 

Its morally wrong to exploit others though, even if they are wealthy companies.

If the OP is making a freeware game he could possibly get the right to use some characters simply by asking nicely, If he is making a commercial project then no sane author would give away their IP for free.

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Its morally wrong to exploit others though, even if they are wealthy companies.

If the OP is making a freeware game he could possibly get the right to use some characters simply by asking nicely, If he is making a commercial project then no sane author would give away their IP for free.
Ups, I didn't want to start the moral discussion :)

 

Anyway, I was, more like, pointing out it's not necessarily an "exploitation", it might be more of a "benefit" for these companies.

 

I'm an indie dev, and overall, we have this problem with our fans' videos being taken out of YouTube because "they had no permission to use copyrighted content and they are making money out of it". It's annoying, because, from an indie point of view such video is a free publicity (and we don't care if they earn some pennies from advertising or whatever, we still earn way, way more thanks to the additional free exposure). And they interfere with it claiming they "protect OUR rights"... Thanks for such "protection", o rightful & lawful people, thanks a lot...

In the end I notice many indie companies put a disclaimer on their websites "we grant anyone the right to use our copyrighted materials in YouTube videos" (and it's a sad necessity since our websites should be about promoting our games, not a board to post various boring legal notices).

Example: http://www.gaslampgames.com/tag/summon-magical-youtube-lawyers/

 

But I guess I can only speak for myself (and probably for other indies) and maybe it is an exploitation of Japanese companies :)

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Regardless if you manage to get away with it or not, do you really want to risk it being shut down?

 

Imagine you work on this for a year, and then release it, and then be forced to take it down. All your hard work for nothing.

 

This is one of the reasons it will be difficult to recruit good members for a project like this.

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How did this thread avoid being locked?

 

 

 


Anyway, I was, more like, pointing out it's not necessarily an "exploitation", it might be more of a "benefit" for these companies.

 

Absolutely it could be of benefit to the companies/individuals who own the IP. However, it is possible for copying to be ruled an infringement even if it increases sales of the original work by providing free advertising.

 

 

 


I'm an indie dev, and overall, we have this problem with our fans' videos being taken out of YouTube because "they had no permission to use copyrighted content and they are making money out of it".

 

I agree this is a messy situation as being played out by Youtube and far too many "errors" have been made that should never occured. Not to mention the automated takedown notice generators that are at best legally shady. 

Edited by Stormynature
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