• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
doyleman77

I don't get c++11.

35 posts in this topic

I don't like some of the additions; things like auto and decltype are not expanding the capability of the language, but only helping some become more comfortable with it.

Even though I agree that these are not adding up to the language, comfort plays a really important role when learning a language. I lost account of how many times I've seen people asking for help when their problem was simply misusing and 'misdeclaring' iterators... This kind of problem adds a lot to the learning curve and features like auto will help anyone who is just starting.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm curious about this that dejaime posted:

 

std::function<double(double)> truncate

 

That syntax in between the <>'s, is that some kind of new language extension? Not heard anything about this but doesn't seem to be something that would have been valid in pre C++-11.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Maybe my coffee hasn't kicked in yet but that looks to me like the function syntax I have been using for years (starting with boost::function, nowadays std::function). It's simply std::function<ReturnType (ParameterType1, ParameterType2, ...)>.

Edit: Boost used to warn that while it's the preferred syntax not all compilers support it. But all the MSVCs I have used it with never complained. Edited by BitMaster
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not a big fan of the way rvalue and perfect forwarding interact.  Perfect forwarding should have had a separate syntax, and not be tacked onto rvalues with unintuitive reference collapsing rules and special template deductions.  I understand the need for perfect forwarding, but it has nothing to do with rvalues... why reuse the syntax??  C++ template deduction rules are already convoluted enough as it is.  They needed to make it simpler, not more complex.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two errors here:
1. Missing default capture mode, must specify either [&] or [=];
2. Missing ; behind lambda definition


Thanks, I usually forget the semicolons. laugh.png

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have grown to accept MSVCs deficiencies. I can live with them when I'm being paid.

For my personal projects I have moved over to QtCreator + MinGW though. After some initial friction (QtCreator can be a bit quirky when you are not used it) the only thing I'm actually missing is MSVC's debugger.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So long as you try not to overly consume language features and kinda stick to the lowest common denominator, I find that code should remain portable with older / non-standard compilers.

 

The really annoying one for me was when std::shared_ptr<T> was in the tr1 namespace on some compilers (std::tr1::shared_ptr<T>) for seemingly a very long time. I had to use a macro to attempt to hack round it whilst fighting off suggestions of "use boost::shared_ptr<T>". (Javascript developers here might feel the same way when every sample code around the internet imposes jquery on your codebase).

 

I am looking forward to the day however when Clang is working fully on OpenBSD and I can ditch eg++ but retain the C++11 features!

 

Edit: Stroustrup actually summarizes my issues with boost quite well here

Edited by Karsten_
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0