• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
rAm_y_

How good do you have to be for a job as a game programmer

11 posts in this topic

At a game studio. I mean how can you be anything bit guru level to actually get a job as a game programmer. I am reading direct11 by Frank Luna just know. How far away would the average game programmer be from someone like Luna for instance. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
How longs a piece of string? Seriously though you'd have to be bringing something to the table..

For example a friend of mine is part of a startup company developing a software solution for a certain profession . he has been getting programmers in for a day or so experience with the company and the people he ended up employing are the ones who could look at the features of the software and say 'why don't you do this?' , those people have been the ones who can prototype it in a quick timescale as well.

The last Peron he took on suggested additional API's for the software and was able to code them up within a few days.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To get through an interview and be offered a job in a games studio you need to be good.

Once you get through the door though its a different story, you will find there is a massive difference in the abilities of all the developers.  Some are absolute genius and some are shockingly bad with the majority of developers somewhere in between.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To state the obvious, visit the websites of a few game studios and check the sections where they advertise employment opportunities. They will tell you exactly what their expectations are.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I mean how can you be anything but guru level to actually get a job as a game programmer.

 

A good development team is going to have a ratio of "Peons" to Gurus greater than 1.  That is, there are going to be more Peons than Gurus, typically anywhere from 2-4 times more.  This is because developing any professional software (games included) requires a substantial amount of what Guru types see as... let's call it menial development work that they are usually quite averse to getting involved with.

 

When I say Peon, I'm really just referring to the average Software Developer with either a BS in CS, or an equivalent amount of demonstrable experience/knowledge.

 

The non-degree path is still a viable path in today's environment, but it does require a lot more motivation, perseverance, and individual drive than the university route.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's a toss up. I've been at game companies where we wrote in C++ and the lead programmer barely knew any c++ and in general the code base was horrible   >_>

Alternatively, I've had two lead programmers who never went to college and were absolutely amazing.

 

Like the post said, it's all about getting through the interview and most of the time the interview isn't about how good of a programmer you are.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like the post said, it's all about getting through the interview and most of the time the interview isn't about how good of a programmer you are.

Yeah, the interviews and tests they do normally don't have anything to do with the programming prowess, but rather your ability to understand the problem and problem solving abilities. 

Though, also, you don't have to work for a company to have a job as a game programmer. You could just look into indie teams and start programming for them or start your own game and program it. With things like kickstarter and the other crowdfunding sites, you can always try to get backed. If you are younger than 18, then just be patient, you have plenty of time to hone your skills and land your dream job.

Edited by BHXSpecter
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have a programming background, but from my experience I've found to get a job you just need to be able to do that job. I've got a background in science, but I got my current job as a 3D artist by just spending a couple of months learning some software and going to a company and saying 'look, I can do this.' They needed someone who could do that, then followed some brief contract work and a trial period, then a job.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Congratulations on being an exception. I do hope your luck continues to hold.

Usually it just isn't being able to do the job. You must be the best fit among their applicants. If they have an endless stream of job applicants (as most big studios do) then finding someone with an art degree AND demonstrated talent is pretty easy.

The big difficulty about being the exception is that while you were exceptional the first time, you may not be exceptional future times. It can be harder to find jobs in the future, and those jobs very likely will not pay as well relative to others who have the degree until you have quite a few years of experience.

Being able to do the task is necessary, but you don't exist in a vacuum.
-1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0