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what is Stereo?

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You ever seen those movies where you need red and blue glasses to see it in "3d"? That's what it is. You render from two slightly different angles on each buffer to get an actual "3D" effect.

Alex Broadwin
A-Tronic Software & Design
-----
"if you fail in life, you were destined to fail. If you suceed in life, call me."
"The answer is out there."
"Please help, I'm using Windows!"

Edited by - ATronic on October 31, 2001 10:07:52 AM

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The human eyes are located on either side of the nose (basically), which means they both "see" a scene from different perspectives. Our brains take this information and piece it together to build up a complete picture including depth data. Notice, for example, that no matter how great the graphics in an FPS your brain knows something is wrong? That''s because though the eyes see the "scene" from different perspectives, they aren''t able to obtain additional (depth) information since there is none.

Stereoscopic viewing is an attempt to deliver such sensory visual data using planar displays by actually rendering two images slightly displaced from each other. One method is as ATronic described, to require the use of red/green glasses (which mask out the respective frequencies resulting in a "normal" picture for each eye); another is to present different images to each eye on each screen. This is often employed in head-mounted displays in virtual reality systems. The advantage of the VR technology is that since the display is mobile, the image can respond to movement of the viewpoint (except it can''t - yet - respond to movement of the eyes alone) and render a different picture, resulting in a far more immersive experience.

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Yep, what he said.

Alex Broadwin
A-Tronic Software & Design
-----
"if you fail in life, you were destined to fail. If you suceed in life, call me."
"The answer is out there."
"Please help, I''m using Windows!"

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi


Stereoscopic viewing is an attempt to deliver such sensory visual data using planar displays by actually rendering two images slightly displaced from each other. One method is as ATronic described, to require the use of red/green glasses (which mask out the respective frequencies resulting in a "normal" picture for each eye); another is to present different images to each eye on each screen.




There are also 'shutter glasses' you can use. You have some glasses synced up to your PC, and you alternate the right and left views on the monitor. The shutter glasses will close over one eye or the other to keep each eye seeing it's own view.

quote:

This is often employed in head-mounted displays in virtual reality systems. The advantage of the VR technology is that since the display is mobile, the image can respond to movement of the viewpoint (except it can't - yet - respond to movement of the eyes alone) and render a different picture, resulting in a far more immersive experience.



Actually, eye tracking is pretty easy to do, and it's used in various sorts of experiments quite frequently. A friend of mine is working on a system to make a mouse pointer on a computer monitor track eye movements, for handicapped computer users. It's true that there isn't any input device based on eye-tracking on the consumer market yet.

Edited by - cheesegrater on October 31, 2001 4:44:28 PM

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I was watching the news and there was a feature on an eye-tracking input device for the disabled. Test subjects were using it to browse the web.

The reason I spoke of eye-tracking as I did is that the blue/green or red/green glasses are often used ith paper, which can give the effect of a 3d picture, but not of a 3d scene (ie, lack of response to change in viewer position). A minor distinction...

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