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rAm_y_

Can you talk the programming techno talk?

26 posts in this topic

If you go onto the SE/SO site it's amazing and quite off-putting some of the answers. The level of knowledge and terminology some people know is quite amazing. 

 

Maybe that just comes with knowledge and practice but I don't think I could reach that level or convey that level I should say. 

 

 

(editor's note: SE/SO refers to "Stack Exchange" and "Stack Overflow")

Edited by swiftcoder
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Humm and.. what SE/SO means?

 

 

It is impolite to use abbreviations without introducing them. Some of the people reading your thread might not think immediately of what "the SE/SO site" means. I guess you are talking about "Stack Exchange" and "Stack Overflow". So instead of saving yourself a few keystrokes you could save others some confusion.

Álvaro had it right.

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And, you know, Google is really good at looking up acronyms.


you know that techno (part of his thread name) is a phone company?
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you know that techno (part of his thread name) is a phone company?

I do know that, but I'm far from convinced that is what this thread is about...

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(editor's note: SE/SO refers to "Stack Exchange" and "Stack Overflow")

 

Why not inline it?

 

I don't like to muck with posts more than is necessary.

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A good example of this is Jon Skeet, the often-sung superstar of SO.


It is for this, that while his skill in undeniable, if he ever walked into my office for an interview I'd walk him back out as that level of solo heroism has no place in enterprise development.

Wow. You sounded just like him right there.

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Great post Servant. Sometimes I feel that way on this site, because usually I want to tune in to topics above me. But I quickly get lost. I was so lost on stackoverflow. haha. 

 

Yes, the responses on this site are adapted to the poster's questions, not assuming the person knows more than they either say they know, or imply they know. 

 

It is the jargon that gets me. The prerequisite knowledge. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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90% of being successful in the tech industry is being able to convey deeply technical concepts to non-technical people (i.e. without jargon). Managers, executives, QA (quality assurance), UX (user experience)... none of these people are engineers, nor necessarily well-versed in whatever it is you do on a daily basis.
 
I'd worry less about picking up the jargon than about being about to convey engineering concepts in plain english. And, you know, Google is really good at looking up acronyms.


I don't know ... I'd try to learn the terminology of the problem domain and the solution domain ... and how they are connected, just to be sure. That is the way I'd think about the general issue.

It helps if you want to be a go-to guy and seem important ...
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I don't know ... I'd try to learn the terminology of the problem domain and the solution domain ... and how they are connected, just to be sure. That is the way I'd think about the general issue.

It helps if you want to be a go-to guy and seem important ...

I can see where that is beneficial, but I can also see where that could be bad. If you are the go-to guy and seem important, but then state something wrong it could affect your credibility as the go-to guy. Would you trust a doctor if they kept goofing the terminology up? So if you are going to learn the terminology, put tons of effort into it as you don't want to be lost or come across as lost.

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