• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
PhilObyte

Democratic Chess

11 posts in this topic

Hello Community,

some of you may have seen "Twitch plays Pokemon".

On the site there is a stream of an emulator that runs an old pokemon game. With the chat, you can press the keys of the virtual gameboy which leads to pure chaos, with sometimes 100,000 players.

 

This gave me the idea for an experiment: what would happen if two large groups would play chess against each other? Just one board and one game. Every team member can vote for the next turn. When a timer reaches zero, the turn with most of the votes is executed. When both teams are large, they would be exactly equally strong (in theory).

 

What do you think about it?

Phil

Edited by PhilObyte
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well it would depend on where you put this and who plays.  If it is the general public it will end up like elections with compulsory voting, no one will have any idea what is actually happening and more or less just pushing random buttons until something does happen.  

 

If you got a control group that included chess players only then this would certainly lead to an interesting experiment.  But like any group voting system the lowest common denominator always wins, so if you had 1 grand master and 99 high school student chess players you could guarantee that after the 3rd or 4th turns the votes of the 99 will not match that of the grand master. 

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm, i once played a 2v2 chess game, was kinda funny.

Off course we didn't vote, but we also agreed not to talk about our moves, and take took turns taking the team's turn, so chaos ruled.

 

Voting with ~100 other players souds boring, there s basically no control, most people don't even vote on their own governments(which actually influence them).

 

There is also a chess-card-package, that "changes" the game a bit, for example one card says pawns now attack streightforward instead of left/right forward,

such thing added could spice up the game.

 

I'm not sure whether players would realy be interested in something like this, but since everyone knows how to play chess it's easy to get them to play a few games,

do make sure the flow of the game is high though.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


There is also a chess-card-package, that "changes" the game a bit, for example one card says pawns now attack streightforward instead of left/right forward,
such thing added could spice up the game.

 

The card game supplement is called "Knightmare Chess" and it's really fun.

Here's the Wiki Entry on it.

I had a friend who bought both sets around the year 2000 and we played it a lot at work.

(Hey, I was working 3rd shift in a call center and it was slow at times.)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I believe the concept would work quite well, but I would remove voting as much as possible. Instead of voting, allow each player on each team to 'make' their proposed move, and when either the timer runs out, or all players have proposed their move, pick the most popular one. In the case of a tie, force players to reassign their votes between the tied options.

It's not quite democracy, because there's no discussion involved, but it will probably move much more quickly and removes a lot of the player administrative overhead.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just wondered how it would work if a giant chessboard with each players have full chess set and battling on a map with some special rules (regulating joint moves of friendly players or etc) (even with some obstacles or opportunities to use board)

Edited by Unduli
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Multiplayer chess boards like you describe have existed for centuries - there's an Indian variant for four players dating back to around 1500, but I've also seen eight player boards.

My personal favourite variant is Diplomat Chess, notably because the bishops move in such a way that they can change colour.
794px-Diplomat_chess.jpg

 

...but that's getting off topic.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am not sure exactly what kind of abuse it might have been, but I am sure there are challenges regarding doing something like this - including the thing they said was not the reason.

 

 

Creative abuse of a captive audience of course.

 

xf0XnNL.png

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your feedback! Unfortunately, I know too little about networking and browser-programming to do this (and I have no large group I could test the idea with), so it will remain a thought experiment.

Edited by PhilObyte
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many Facebook friends do you have? Pretty easy test bed. Build a chess board with free move pieces and send it to all your friends. Send out a notice for a white move. Collect white moves. Post the updated board with the voted on move(maybe some of the the popular votes) and the notice for a black move. Take a re-vote on ties. You might have to do a lot of the initial work by msging or posting unless you know how to dig into facebook. But either way you'll get some feedback. The unique idea behind this experiment is allowing everyone to vote black and white. Letting the socialization between moves dictate the "side" the players end up favoring. By making it a free move chess board players can show off their knowledge of the game and their willingness to "play along". It would be interesting if you made it through a game. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How many Facebook friends do you have? Pretty easy test bed. Build a chess board with free move pieces and send it to all your friends. Send out a notice for a white move. Collect white moves. Post the updated board with the voted on move(maybe some of the the popular votes) and the notice for a black move. Take a re-vote on ties. You might have to do a lot of the initial work by msging or posting unless you know how to dig into facebook. But either way you'll get some feedback. The unique idea behind this experiment is allowing everyone to vote black and white. Letting the socialization between moves dictate the "side" the players end up favoring. By making it a free move chess board players can show off their knowledge of the game and their willingness to "play along". It would be interesting if you made it through a game. 

 

Sounds exciting, but I would need to learn from the beginning, I have no clue how multiplayer and databases work. It stays a cool idea, I maybe realize in the future ;-)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0