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Tutorial Doctor

I need a Simple IDE for practicing programming.

20 posts in this topic

So, I downloaded Pythonista and Codea on my iPad. Pythonista is an IDE for writing python on the iPad, and I sure wish there was a desktop version. Codea is another IDE and it uses LUA. 

 

About a week ago a person actually made a whole GUI library for Codea using Lua. Both Pythonista and Codea are fantastic mobile IDEs, and I love to use them to practice.

 

However, when it comes to the laptop, I have three main choices I can think of. You have Visual Studio, Xcode, and Eclipse. There are other IDEs that are like Eclipse. I think there was one named Komodo. 

 

Thing about these IDEs is that they are bloated. They have menus and options out the whazoo. For a beginner, it is just too much. I don't know what half of half of the functions do (that would be a quarter hehe).

 

There are plenty of text editors, but they don't have compilers. And you can't test stuff really. I have this game engine that I could use, but it is difficult to use on a mac (I am starting to prefer to use my mac instead of my toshiba). 

 

Does anyone know of an IDE with a basic interface (perhaps like Scite or Smultron) that can compile programs (something that at least can print stuff to a console)?

 

I have found that Hype2 is perfect for practicing javascript (for mac). 

 

Update:

Yes, I am going with QtCreator for several reasons:

 

1) It is free!

2) It has a bunch of example files

3) It was designed to be de-cluttered, and it is easy to all the extra stuff out of the way and get to your code. 

4) It has good help documentation

5) It's so cute! haha. 

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s7PgHmuFaGY

 

note: Qt Creator "just works" on the mac, but there are so many extra steps I have to take to get started with it on the PC. I have to choose compilers and kits and such. 

note: Yes, there is a 20mb version, but the larger version has all the examples and stuff in it. 

 

Link to download QtCreator: (for anyone who might be interested)

http://qt-project.org/downloads

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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Does anyone know of an IDE with a basic interface (perhaps like Scite or Smultron) that can compile programs (something that at least can print stuff to a console)?

 

There's one called Geany. It's a very minimal IDE, more like a text editor with some extra features.

 

Personally I go with scite on windows or vi on linux for editing, and bash for invoking compiler and git. Never had the need for all the fancy IDE stuff.

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Geany's what I've encountered that fits your description too when looking for a better text editor, though it didn't suit my purposes.

But I agree with Scarabus2. IDEs make compiling and debugging much easier. You don't have to use every feature of an IDE, but there's nothing better for debugging than a good IDE integrated debugger.
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Selecting a Simple IDE really depends on the goal you wish to achieve.  There are many out there.  Some require compiling before executing and others allow you to run without Compiling.  Microsofts Visual Studios  Allow you to run without compiling, Both in Basic and C++.  For Form Based Applications I use Visual Basic.

 

  For Hobby Purposes with some games I Use Blitz,  either BlitzPlus or Blitz3D.  All are free for downloading from either Microsoft or BlitzBasic websites respectively.  Blitz comes with a reference library and enough sample code to get you started.

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I actually get lost Bregma. I used Xcode for the first time yesterday, and the newest version is all over the place (coming from a beginners standpoint). I just wanted a simple white screen, a console, and some way to test stuff. But I had windows out the wahzoo. Interfaces like this make me afraid to click anything because I might break something (don't know what half the stuff does.)

 

There are very few software that I have used that are intuitive enough to be able to figure out without having to search endlessly on youtube to find tutorials for. 

The way documentation is done today is so variable, and poorly presented overall. 

 

It reminds me of the videos I saw by Andrew Price about the interface of Blender. No one doubts its ability, but it defeats, on most fronts, the principles of good user interface design. 

 

I just supposed that software like Xcode was indeed made for the big boys (I am a little boy at the moment), and so that is why I need something less intimidating. 

 

I think that if Pythonista goes to mac/windows, it will gain popularity amongst developers quickly. That goes for this app named Editorial also, which is a markdown editor for iPad that can use Python to automate writing tasks. 

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It reminds me of the videos I saw by Andrew Price about the interface of Blender. No one doubts its ability, but it defeats, on most fronts, the principles of good user interface design.

thing about these IDEs is that they are bloated . . .
For a beginner, it is just too much . . .

The IDEs are bloated? From a beginners view . . . ? Defeats the principles of a good user interface?
It should be:
I feel the IDEs are bloated from my point of view. From my point of view . . . From my view, it defeats the principles of a good user interface . . .
Everything new has to appear bloated because they are new, synfig studio being the exception.
You'll soon start making your non-bloated software ;).
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It would definitely be very convenient to have one that can compile several languages, but I didn't expect as much. Is there one? I am going to try some of the ones suggested here when I get a chance. 

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Everything new thing has to appear bloated because they are new, synfig studio being the exception.
You'll soon start making your non-bloated software ;).

 

Haha, I have actually used synfig studio, it is rather bloated. I guess the word I should say is cramped? And you are right, I should say "from my point of view" because it might not be the case to someone else. Although, when comparing it to something like Scite (interface wise) it does look a bit much "to a beginner I guess." hehe. 

 

It is good to have features, and I am sure Apple took a little more care than others about which features they included, and I am also sure those extra features help things get done faster, but I just want something less intimidating for now. 

 

I guess I was being a little definitive. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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It would definitely be very convenient to have one that can compile several languages, but I didn't expect as much. Is there one? I am going to try some of the ones suggested here when I get a chance.

Zeus IDE. Just found it on google and according to their site, it's language neutral, windows based, simple, lightweight and oh, 20 MB.
Synfig studio is truly bad. It doesn't even have an eraser tool and all those ugly windows are everywhere.
*edit* after more searching, it isn't just according to their site. Zeus IDE has built-in support for more than 20 programming languages (C++, C, D, Java, Ruby, Python, Lua etc.), includes syntax highlighting, can be configured for your language and is more than 5 times smaller than Visual C++ Express at just 20MB.
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Thanks Nathan, I am downloading it right now. It is much simpler than Eclipse. This setup is exactly what I was looking for. I will try it out. 

 

Edit: well, it is free to try software. If I can't find anything free, I will see if it is worth the purchase. 

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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Downloading QtCreator and Code:Blocks right now. Thanks folks!

 

The first time I used eclipse I didn't know that much about programming, so perhaps it got me. The second time I used Eclipse it was with the Android SDK (a whole lot of extra stuff I didn't know how to use), so perhaps that got me too. 

 

I need to try Eclipse again too. We will see. Thanks again. 

 

QT Creator is looking like a winner...

Edited by Tutorial Doctor
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Thanks Everyone, I am going to go with QtCreator I think. It will help me get used to working in a larger IDE, and soon I might need those extra features. Thank everyone who posted. 

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Just a note: QtCreator is excellent, my IDE of choice and what I use for everything these days, Qt and non-Qt alike. But if you are looking for an out of the box, install and start building solution it isn't it. You either have to learn to deal with Qt's .PRO files or write your own make files.

 

I wouldn't normally bother warning someone about this as two minutes on Google is normally enough to figure it out, but since the tone of the thread seems to be "Everything is so bloated and hard for beginners", its worth mentioning. The advantage of Visual Studio, for example, is it is a case of install and start coding. Normally.

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Thanks Aardvajk for the tip. I download Visual studio (the express version I think) and it did look nice, but I had to create some sort of account or something. I wasn't ready to do all of that. I don't even know what make files are (I probably do, but I can't remember what they are), so that is how new I am. hehe. 

 

Good confirmation about QtCreator. I think it is going to spoil me. haha. I keep jumping around from one programming language to another so a "one stop shop" is the best IDE for me, so long as it just lets me get right to that blank empty page and test my code. This is one of the reasons I like Python's IDLE program. It is actually the perfect IDE for me (although it was sorta strange setting it up). I wish other languages had similar IDEs, or at least one IDE had a setup like IDLE but could compile various languages. 

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Learning the tools is a significant part of the battle unfortunately. I still think there is benefit with C++ to start at the command line, at least until you have a decent grasp of the compilation and linking process. An IDE can make more sense when you understand what it is doing for you.

But I'm a grumpy dinosaur so others would probably disagree. Best of luck anyway.
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