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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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takumi naoya

Ask for Opinion & Answer

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after im follow day by day on gamedev.net and train my self from example and experiment on my own

i found some question for my self and a bit for my programming problem im sorry if i ask to much on this post but i want to know sure what i missing.

 

.:: Question

1. What is exactly 2.5D is what the different from 3D and 2D? is likely you use your character 2D and the background is 3D..

2. I want move some object not just forward backward ("x") and up down ("y") but can move corresponding oblique angle desired (algorithm)

 

.:: Opinion

1. what made you want to become a game developer? it just for provit, hobby, or something?

2. Why we game developers must hide your game script for public?

 

 

 

 

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sin(angle) is the amount to move along the X to move a distance of 1
cos(angle) is the amount to move along the Y to move a distance of 1
 
So if you are at x, y and want to move n units by angle a:
 
     x += sin(a) * n
     y += cos(a) * n

 

Wrong way around (conventionally the zero angle points along the x-axis). But yes, and as you said using linear algebra with normalized velocities you get this stuff "for free" without having to really mess around with angles, which have nasty discontinuities and are generally a pain to work with.

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1. what made you want to become a game developer? it just for provit, hobby, or something?

profit....laugh.pnglaugh.pnglaugh.pnglaugh.png  ...really.. if you want to get rich, play lottery (same chance as to get a profitable game hit).  If you want to earn money, then learn a profession and get a job (even as game developer, but at the end of the day it is just a job).

 

Being a game developer is more about being an idealist and less about profit. tongue.png

 


2. Why we game developers must hide your game script for public?

You sometimes need to install a (ineffective) way to protect you scripts for legal issues, even if it do not prevent someone from getting access to it.

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sin(angle) is the amount to move along the X to move a distance of 1
cos(angle) is the amount to move along the Y to move a distance of 1
 
So if you are at x, y and want to move n units by angle a:
 
     x += sin(a) * n
     y += cos(a) * n

 

Wrong way around (conventionally the zero angle points along the x-axis). But yes, and as you said using linear algebra with normalized velocities you get this stuff "for free" without having to really mess around with angles, which have nasty discontinuities and are generally a pain to work with.

 

 

Oops, yes, of course. And its also worth noting if you are writing 2D games using screen coordinates, you have to invert the Y as math traditionally considers upwards on the Y axis to be positive and down negative, whereas screenspace is the opposite way around.

 

Thanks for the clarification, had a funny feeling something was wrong as I typed that :)

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2. Why we game developers must hide your game script for public?


We don't always. Plenty of games have left their scripts open, either because they didn't care or to let modders use them.

Really, it depends on the game. Some games compile the scripts in some way for speed purposes, so any "obfuscation" is really just a by-product of technical choices. Some games put a lot of gameplay-sensitive data in scripts that would allow you to cheat achievements or something they are obfuscated in some way to make the game more fair. Some games are written by paranoid people who don't want their IP reused by other people. Some developers do it because that's how the last engine/game they worked on did it and they don't have the time or incentive to rethink if it's actually necessary. Some games want to protect the user against mods or downloaded user content that can exploit the engine's security flaws and developers sometimes (foolishly) think that obfuscation of scripts is a useful way to do that (most game developers are pretty focused in their skillset and have little to no understanding of broader CS industry topics like security, in my experience).

On the other hand, some games go out of their way to keep the script code open. Some even put in the effort to document the scripts for modders, or even provide entire modding tool suites.
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2. Why we game developers must hide your game script for public?


Do you mean "script" specifically, or any source code?
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To me, 2.5D games could also mean games that are traditionally done with sprites, but is done with 3D graphics instead.

 

For example, I consider Mega Man X8 to be 2.5D, because it is a 2D platformer (move left and right, jump up) with 3D graphics. Sometimes the camera rotates on the vertical axis when mega man walks into a hallway with a turn, but you are still moving left or right, relative to the screen.

 

But it gets fuzzy when the 3D graphics isn't very apparent or everywhere.

 

For example, I consider Castlevania: Symphony of the Night to be 2D, even though it uses 3D graphics (save point coffin and the ghost swordsman Azaghal are some obvious 3D objects). I think it's because the camera is moved in strictly 2 dimensions.

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To me, 2.5D games could also mean games that are traditionally done with sprites, but is done with 3D graphics instead.



For example, I consider Mega Man X8 to be 2.5D, because it is a 2D platformer (move left and right, jump up) with 3D graphics. Sometimes the camera rotates on the vertical axis when mega man walks into a hallway with a turn, but you are still moving left or right, relative to the screen.

 

Yeah, another example would be duke nukem 3d, where the world was 3d but the enemy where 2d sprites. Ha the good ol times...

 

"Come get some!" laugh.png

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To me a 2.5D game means a game with strictly 2D (or very nearly 2D) gameplay embedded in a 3D (or pseudo-3D) environment. But I imagine there is no "true" definition of 2.5D and everyone has its own which falls somewhere between "not 2D" and "not 3D" wink.png

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