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codeman_nz

What makes a game fun

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Game Speed is another factor for game play.   A Racing game should feel like a racing game where reflex is important.  Code should feel responsive to the players actions.

For me this holds extremely true to certain type of role playing games.  FPS and Fighter Simulations Code should feel like when you pull the trigger or through a punch, the game code is responding immediately.

Strategy, should keep to a turn based system.  Real Time Strategies (RTS) with an Artificial Intelligence (AI) player tend to favor the software as levels progress, I usually lose interest after the 5th or 6th level once progression has been stopped.

  Games should Challenge The Player, If Failure is part of the game design then so be it. If your game has a linear design where certain task must be completed within a certain time period 100%, then that is a poor game design. Although let us say that you only have to complete 75% of those task in order to progress then that is challenging.  When Failure then happens, which will stop game progression, the player could restart play, do something different, continue on to see how many of these task are completed, then when time is up if the player obtained at least 75% (They do not have to know) then game play can continue.

  Here is the catch, and challenge to the game designer / programmer... If the player needs a key to unlock the door, but did not get the key in the previous step, but did achieve an 80% completion rate to advance, you should design a system where the player can get that key later.  Give the player say 3 chances to get the key.

  I think if this is done, for me at least, it will not only challenge me, but keep my interest as well!

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Before I decide to play a game, I see a lot of screenshots, gameplay videos, trailers, concept art -- in other words, the graphics. If the game doesn't look good, that can turn me off of playing it.

 

But once I get immersed, the graphics go away. The sprites/polygons become people, buildings, streets, what have you. Unless the art suddenly changes style or something doesn't jive with the color scheme or the graphics glitch out or some important item blends in with the background, I don't even notice.

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many things, maybe even unlimited amount of things, to long list to mention

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For me a game is fun primarily because it makes me think a mix of interesting and pleasant thoughts.  Thoughts can be inspired by story, art, and gameplay that requires strategic thought or creative problem solving.

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The problem with defining 'fun' in any particular sense is that the concept is different for each individual person. One person can like shooters, another can hate them. Simply taking what the first person says at face value, and creating a simple shooter game, will only satisfy the first person.

 

However if you put, say, 5 people together and ask them whether they like being able to customise their character. If four people say yes, and one person says no, then being able to customise your character can be considered, in a fundamental sense, 'fun'.

 

This is where things start getting picky. In reality, you can define fun simply by saying 'anything the majority of people consider entertaining'. Yet that one person still finds it boring. This is where you look at two things. Who am I aiming for within my game? Once you achieve that, then you ask: what does the majority of the target audience consider entertainment?

 

So, for example, you decided to create a rogue-like. Your target audience is rogue-like fans, now you research what your target audience preferences in entertainment are. One of the biggest factors in a rogue-like for the fans is the variation within the randomness, the more they feel like every game is different, the more they enjoy the experience.

 

In reality, you'll never satisfy everyone. Just look at what you can do.

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