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blueshogun96

Game Trailer Pages?

4 posts in this topic

I'm not sure if I used the right words to describe what I'm talking about.  I already tried Googling this, but nothing related to what I'm searching for comes up, so I'll have to give an example.  Take a look at this page created by a member of gamedev.net (who's name I can't remember because he only appeared once on the chat):

 

http://runordiegame.com/

 

Now, there are handfuls of pages on the net about making a trailer, advertising, monetization and what not, but I can't seem to find any articles on what makes a good page designed for a game trailer.  My assumptions would be this, as a starting point at least:

 

- The page should be a subdomain.[your domain].com/net

- Have a decently sized and polished trailer in the center.

- A short but precise written description of the game.

- Links to social networking pages (i.e. twitter, facebook, linked-in, google+, tumblr, youtube, blogger, etc.) with appropriate icons.

- Icons symbolizing what platforms it will be available for.

- Copyright and legal information at the bottom.

- Link to the main website.

- Links to a kickstarter (if applicable).

- Optimizations for mobile devices?

 

That's all that I can think of off the top of my head, since I'm actually about to leave rather soon.  I'm sure there's much more to it than this though.  So, any ideas?  Thanks.

 

Shogun.

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Hello.

- The page should be a subdomain.[your domain].com/net

Why is that? The link itself for that "Run or Die" game that you shared does not make use of subdomains.
You can find game websites that use either of these naming conventions, so it's mostly based on taste.
A) http://supernauts.com/
B) http://tearaway.mediamolecule.com/

To my taste, I would avoid using subdomains because they make the addresses longer and harder to memorize, precisely the opposite of what they should be - easy to type and to memorize.
 

- Have a decently sized and polished trailer in the center.
- A short but precise written description of the game.
- Links to social networking pages (i.e. twitter, facebook, linked-in, google+, tumblr, youtube, blogger, etc.) with appropriate icons.
- Icons symbolizing what platforms it will be available for.
- Copyright and legal information at the bottom.
- Link to the main website.
- Links to a kickstarter (if applicable).

Except for the "link to the main website" point, I find that these points are addressed by web-design theory; it's not something exclusive to game websites. You can still learn how to make a game website if you research how to make proper generic websites.
You are after a polished presentation, smooth user experience and proper legal protection by supplying terms of service and privacy policy documents (almost if not all websites carry these as links on the page footer).

Regarding the "link to the main website" point, what is the main website if not the one already with the trailer?
Why would you need another different website for presenting the game? The same website used to display the trailer and game summary etc. can still have links to the message boards, online stores etc. Edited by Kryzon
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Oh, wow, I didn't realize anyone had replied to this thread!

 

Hello.
 

- The page should be a subdomain.[your domain].com/net

Why is that? The link itself for that "Run or Die" game that you shared does not make use of subdomains.
You can find game websites that use either of these naming conventions, so it's mostly based on taste.
A) http://supernauts.com/
B) http://tearaway.mediamolecule.com/

To my taste, I would avoid using subdomains because they make the addresses longer and harder to memorize, precisely the opposite of what they should be - easy to type and to memorize.
 

- Have a decently sized and polished trailer in the center.
- A short but precise written description of the game.
- Links to social networking pages (i.e. twitter, facebook, linked-in, google+, tumblr, youtube, blogger, etc.) with appropriate icons.
- Icons symbolizing what platforms it will be available for.
- Copyright and legal information at the bottom.
- Link to the main website.
- Links to a kickstarter (if applicable).

Except for the "link to the main website" point, I find that these points are addressed by web-design theory; it's not something exclusive to game websites. You can still learn how to make a game website if you research how to make proper generic websites.
You are after a polished presentation, smooth user experience and proper legal protection by supplying terms of service and privacy policy documents (almost if not all websites carry these as links on the page footer).

Regarding the "link to the main website" point, what is the main website if not the one already with the trailer?
Why would you need another different website for presenting the game? The same website used to display the trailer and game summary etc. can still have links to the message boards, online stores etc.

 

My game's name and my website's domain are short and easy to remember (in theory).  It should be easy enough to set up a means to redirect to that subdomain since I already have a domain capable of redireceting URLs IIRC.

 

I have a company website which is the main portal to my game dev related projects.  I'm not just writing one game here.  Why just have one small page representing yourself when you can have a well designed main webpage to go along with it?  This is what larger professional game companies tend to do IMO.

 

 

You're probably looking for the concept of a "press kit".

 

presskit() is a free and easy way of creating a fairly standardised looking press kit, and is becoming a very popular way of doing so.  See also this Pixel Prospector page on press kits.

 

You might also apply some of the great tips CopyBlogger have to offer on landing pages that sell and successful sales pages.  Most importantly, your prominent video should be accompanied by a strong and unambiguous call to action; after viewing, your audience should download/buy your game now.

 

 

Responding specifically to a couple of your points:

 

 

 


The page should be a subdomain.[your domain].com/net

I agree with Kryzon above; this isn't a standard approach at all, and there are many prominent examples of games that don't use a subdomain in this way.  There's nothing particularly wrong with choosing to use a sub-domain (noting Kryzon's point about the url potentially being harder to remember), but it's certainly not a rule you should feel the need to follow.

 

 

 


Link to the main website.

Again I find myself agreeing with Kryzon -- the page with the trailer probably is "the main website".  It occurs to me however that you may mean a link to a download page or distribution channel for the game, in which case you're absolutely correct that this should be prominently included, possibly even more than once depending on your page layout; you may for example provide links both above and below other content.  Note that for free games or demo's if it's possible to do so you're probably better off providing direct download links rather than linking to another page.

 

 

Hope that helps! smile.png

Those links are much appreciated!  I think this should help.  Oh, and obviously, I responded with my reasoning to the points you addressed.  The link to the main page isn't intended to get viewers to download the game, but (if they desire) they can go to my primary domain and see what else I have going.

 

Shogun.

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I have a company website which is the main portal to my game dev related projects.  I'm not just writing one game here.  Why just have one small page representing yourself when you can have a well designed main webpage to go along with it?  This is what larger professional game companies tend to do IMO.

It wouldn't be a page representing yourself, but your game. A promotional page, like the one for the "Supernauts" game that I linked to previously.

That webpage is objective and explains what the game is about with a summary, images and a video.
Additionally, at the bottom of the page there's the logo and link to the developer's website, so there is a connection between the two.
This is a style that I'm comfortable with.

It is a subjective choice, however, and you can find game websites in this and other styles - such as the child pages under the developer or publisher domain, like http://www.thelastofus.playstation.com/. Edited by Kryzon
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