• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
kaktusas2598

Is learning 3D modelling for programmer is TIme Waste?

23 posts in this topic

Hello everyone, currently I am creating mario clonr game with SDL 2.0 and plan to create 2D RPG with SDL. After that I plan to learn some 3D game engine(Mayvbe Unity or C++ based, cause I use C++ mainly - u recommend me variant :) ) and then OpenGL.. And I am thinking if learning some 3d modelling soft like Blender for creating models for my future games is worth my time. Considering a fact, my dream is to be game programmer. Could 3D modelling skills is worth learning for my start as indie developer? Thanks, for any responses :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's worth your time. It's helpful in creating test models. It's helpful to understand what your artists are actually doing. It's helpful to be able to test tweaks to artists' work. It's helpful to be able to work with prefab content. And eventually, it's helpful to be able to script these tools to output extra data needed for a graphics engine.

Aaaand its helpful to understand the awful amount of talent and work that you need to put on a model for it to look good. Which is an insta +1 to your "Perspective of things" skill.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you all for responses, I really aprreciate then. Now I think having free time after uni (studying Computer Engineering) I will pick some Blender tutorials at official Blender site (http://www.blender.org/support/tutorials/) and after that I will try to combine these skills with some engine or straight away with OpenGL. Can u guys recommend me some good C++ game engine? I was thinking about Unity 3D(I know it is not C++).

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks, for responses :) That would u recommend me to learn after blender for creating full 3D game? I was thinking either jump to OpenGL and hard-code everything, or first try to use engine such as Ogre, learn engine principles and after that dive inti OpenGL... Which option would be better? I eventually plan to start learning OpenGL in max one year period.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You'll need to decide whether you want to program games or graphics.  With Unity you have an api specifically for developing games, whilst OpenGL is a long established graphics api standard.

 

Saying that, would it not be possible to use SDL with OpenGL?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, I could use SDl for Windowing and Input, OpenGL for Graphics and Blender for models :) I dont want unity because it's not C++ based.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


I dont want unity because it's not C++ based.

 

God I want to smash my head off a wall everytime I read something like this.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


I dont want unity because it's not C++ based.

 

God I want to smash my head off a wall everytime I read something like this.

 

Why? :) I am comfortable with C++ and want to use tools what are oriented with it, is it bad?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 


I dont want unity because it's not C++ based.

 

God I want to smash my head off a wall everytime I read something like this.

 

Why? smile.png I am comfortable with C++ and want to use tools what are oriented with it, is it bad?

 

 

In some cases, no.  In most, especially in beginner game forums, yes.

 

 

I dont honestly know your skill levels, or reasoning behind preferring C++, so in your case it might make perfect sense.

 

In the majority of cases I read something like that, its generally a person making decisions using knowledge they dont possess (group/hive think at it's best).  In many, possibly most cases, the programming language of choice should be among the least important factors on choosing an engine.  Now, requiring a C/C++ interface so you can expand the engine, that makes a lot of sense for a pro dev studio, but frankly Unity has that.

Edited by Serapth
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I recommend that beginners pick up five languages, the most critical being C++, Java, and C#, the less critical being Python and Perl.

 

Perl? 

 

Is it just a matter of a character building exercise?  ;)

 

This would make an extremely interesting meta-thread.  What five language would (experienced) developers recommend (new) developers learn...

 

Off the top of my head I think I would go, in order...

 

Lua, C# or Java, JavaScript, a functional ( LISP, F#, Scala, others... ) language, C++.  I might swap C++ and the functional language in priority, but I honestly think the experience of learning functional programming would make for a better rounded programmer than C++, especially after having learned Java or C#.  However, as functional constructs are added to C# ( and to a lesser degree Java and C++ ) , the value of learning another language just to get your head around functional programming loses a great deal of value.

 

That said, I dont consider many domain specific languages in that list.  For example HTML, CSS, SQL, HLSL...  I suppose I should, but really, those are the kind of things you learn as you use/need them.  At the end of the day, if I had a time machine and could go back and alter the way I learned things I would have a) spent a lot longer in BASIC or PASCAL before moving on b) learned LISP earlier before my brain developed into a C formed mindset.  Also kinda wish I learned Smalltalk, but every time I tried, the tools and performance on consumer hardware was just appallingly shitty.

Edited by Serapth
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A beginner should focus on learning fundamental skills that are transferrable rather than attempting to "learn" as many languages as they can. Same goes for 3D packages.

 

For example, if a programmer does not make efforts to eliminate fluff in their code,nor comment or test it, then that weakness will continue to prevail in the next language they learn.  True, a new language can show similarities and differences between previous langugages, but they will remain a sloppy programmer harrassed by unnecessary compiler errors and runtime bugs.  Chances are they will grow frustrated and blame their language and tools rather than their weak skill and lack of training.

 

This is also true for 3D artists; If a beginner does not create or collect enough reference material, nor spend time implementing good topology, then they will remain a poor modeller.

Edited by Anri
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Frob, I agree with u, but I do not consider myself a beginner programmer, because I have been programming since 14 (7 years now), and I am fearly comfortable with C++, Python, Java, Javascript, HTML and CSS, SQL, Matlab, a little less with C#. Thank you for advices, I will keep in mind that :)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have fun with the 3D stuff Kaktusas, if you do decide to pursue it.  And if you do go with Blender then I'm SamusDrake over on BlenderArtistis.org.  Feel free to drop me a line if you get stuck.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One recommendation I would give on this:

Don't get too bogged down into the details.  If you want to be the Programmer, just get the basics down on the art tools.  Don't spend too long on them.

I can say this from experience.  Just get a good skeleton of the art work done ya need, then get an artist who has artistic talents to do the full work lol.

It is real easy to get sidetracked into trying to create the art work when you are not the "Artist".  This takes away time that could be better spent coming up

with game features / fixes.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0