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fir

broad phase and narrow phase

3 posts in this topic

Im curious if someone noticed the thing closed to my own view on

things: When i am working on programming (and i do it last 5 years

consecutive) i notice that i got two phases in it 

 

- broad phase - when i do general learning on many different thing 

(opengl, opencl, assembly, raytracing, optymization, rasterization... etc almost countles number of topics) -- it is very time consuming

 

- narrow phase - when i focus on my own code testing and experimenting

 

I noticed that broad phase consumes me a very large amount of time,

when i was more newbie I was doing more narrow phase coding (though my knowledge was more 'narrow'), recently really the broad phase things consumes

me rally over 90% of time (and sometimes i feel an urge to convince myself

to stop learning and go more with my hands into code 

 

Have somebody some opinions on that ?

 

 

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- broad phase - when i do general learning on many different thing
- narrow phase - when i focus on my own code testing and experimenting

 

What you're talking about is

- research

- and development

Often called "R&D."  Actually, "experimenting" (which you included in your "narrow phase") is part of "research." 

Every project inevitably involves some research, whether or not it precedes development (it may precede a particular task in the development process).

Many people use an iterative process that includes "experimenting" as you describe.

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- broad phase - when i do general learning on many different thing
- narrow phase - when i focus on my own code testing and experimenting

 

What you're talking about is

- research

- and development

Often called "R&D."  Actually, "experimenting" (which you included in your "narrow phase") is part of "research." 

Every project inevitably involves some research, whether or not it precedes development (it may precede a particular task in the development process).

Many people use an iterative process that includes "experimenting" as you describe.

 

I would call experimenting narrow phase - this is becouse for me every code writing is experimenting (I got no way to be sure how the thing
Im trying to do will really work/ look like)
Narrow phase is just coding (some project), broad phase is general learning.
As to research: broad phase (the thing i call it this name) is not really needed strictly for the project, but this is needed to be considered a reasonable programmer (todays programmers are expected to know broad scope of topics)
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Hi,

 

 

"Research is the intellectual backbone of game development...," found in  my signature below here. Research goes through phases, but in my opinion it should be according to needs and purposes for the most part. In other words, it should mostly be tied directly to what you need to learn for your current and near future game development processes. I will even go so far as to say that as you gain experience, then it will also be tied to both your source control and your  version control systems in the form of documentation, especially that which relates to the coding at hand.

 

What I am writing here is for anybody intending to have long term success in game development with the most efficient progress, but people who only do this as a hobby should focus on the things that bring them pleasure. Documentation is important for both philosophies of professional and hobbyist, however it is critical for professionals in regard to research that research documentation be directly connected in the development software to the coding. This serves many purposes as you can probably already imagine.  A major benefit to documenting your research is that it holds you more accountable to not wander too much in your research, since you will tend to always be reminded everyday of the ultimate objective of your research, thus not "waste any time" with bunny trails.  Some wandering is going to happen naturally because curiosity is too powerful to prevent all of the time, yet I believe that some benefit of learning for the future is to be had with it.

 

The more needs that you have in game development, then the more that you will see the logic of what I wrote here.

Edited by 3Ddreamer
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