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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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Dillon.Irish

Starting Point

5 posts in this topic

Hello everyone!

 

First post on this site, really excited to join the community! I am currently a sophomore college student working towards my computer science degree at a four year college. Over the past few semester I've taken  a bunch of coding and data structure classes that have allowed my to dip my feet into a few different aspects of coding. Sadly nothing I have worked on so far has really peaked my interest. Being a long time gamer, I figured I'd give game creation a try. My school doesn't offer any game design/development classes, so this is something I have to starting looking into on my own. 

 

My question is where should I start? I've learned a handful of languages(C++, Java, Javascript, HTML, CSS, Scala), but I'm not sure if any of those are good starting points. I'd like to stay more on the coding side of game development, but playing around with tools like Unity seems like fun too. Also any book recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

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I know it may seem boring now, but once you have your CS degree you will be armed with enough programming skill to confidently write your own games and be able to enjoy coding on your own terms.

 

Saying that, if you know Java or C++ well enough to display 2D images, load in data from files and obtain keyboard input...why not write an old-school games like Thunderforce or Adventure of Zelda in your free time?

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On the Book side of things, Search Amazon of Barnes and Noble for Game Programming Books,  Narrow your search to Books Only.

There are many good books out there, Covering Several languages so Keep your Eye on that.  There is also alot of free or trial version languages and SDKs available so you can test-drive many off them before you buy.

I Would Start with Game Programming : All - In -One or Game:Programming for Teens < Do Not let the Title Fool You.  It is a good book to Start with

 

Now here is the Kick-in-the-seat-of-your-Pant!!  General Programming and Game Programming are NOT The same animal.  From the same Family, but one is a Cat while the other is a Lion.  For General Programming, you have to understand the Language you are using and and be able to assemble lines of code in and organized manner to produce the desired results the end user wants. Here the end user tells you want they want. ( Use a Fast-Food menu keyboard for example - I want to Eat <in> = Fast Food <out>

 

With Game Programming Not only do you need the above, But know you need to know how a game is supposed to work, Why it is fun to play, Graphics, and you have to Guess at what the end-user wants to get out of your game.  The Obvious answer is Fun.


why not write an old-school games like Thunderforce or Adventure of Zelda in your free time?

I would not start anywhere near this type of game.  While it may seam simple and easy to an experienced Game Programmer, it Could frustrate the beginner by the length of programming involved.   Tic-Tac-Toe Could Take well over 100 lines of code depending on language and SDK

  Keep your first game simple, Try Text only.  or a word game like hangman,  do a TV game show in text like Wheel -Of-Fortune.  A Board Game like Monopoly, depending on set-up uses Over 50 Different Graphic Images.

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I would not start anywhere near this type of game. While it may seam simple and easy to an experienced Game Programmer, it Could frustrate the beginner by the length of programming involved. Tic-Tac-Toe Could Take well over 100 lines of code depending on language and SDK

Keep your first game simple, Try Text only. or a word game like hangman, do a TV game show in text like Wheel -Of-Fortune. A Board Game like Monopoly, depending on set-up uses Over 50 Different Graphic Images.

 

I do agree with you that a first game should be kept as simple as possible(even shake your hand on that one), but in this instance its difficult to tell how far along our friend is.  If they are taking a good course then they may have already written a few simple games and may possess the skills necessary for such a project.

 

Maybe they can ellaborate further on the progress they have made, so we can advise them better?

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