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JayNori

Computer Science vs Software Engineering

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I am pursuing a bachelor's degree in either Computer Science or Software Engineering, though I've noticed a lot of jobs requiring a bachelor's in C.S. but both majors roughly have the same classes. So my question is which major would benefit me the most? Thanks in advance guys. :)

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They are pretty much the same, software engineering might be more oriented on the work space where Computer Science  might be more focused on theory, this is not a hard rule though.

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Software engineering focuses on processes and procedures involved in the development of computer programs at the human level.  Computer science focuses on the mathematical basis of computation at the abstract (M-space¹) level.  There will be a great deal of overlap, especially in the vaguely-related subjects of computer programming, calculus, and elective topics from other disciplines.

 

Employers look for the magic presence of a degree in some related field.  Pursue the one that calls to you the most because you will spend the rest of your life with what you learn, so make sure it's something you like.

 

 

¹ Yes, I just made that up.  Consider it related to Pratchett's L-space via a simple ontological linear projection. If you find that humourous, choose computer science over software engineering.

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Honestly, most job don't even require degree, most company care about your knowledge and experience.

So, it's doesn't really matter, choose what you like, you will still be able to get your dream job. :)

Edited by Melkon

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Honestly, most job don't even require degree, most company care about your knowledge and experience.

So, it's doesn't really matter, choose what you like, you will still be able to get your dream job. smile.png

 

In theory, that might be correct, but in practice, most companies will look at your resume, and, if they don't see a degree, the resume goes in the trash.

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Well... engineering will have the same basis of all engineering courses: heavy math, calculus, physics and so on...

 

Computer engineering also have a strong electronics theory and you may understand how the computers are made, and maybe how to design better computers...

 

you also will learn advanced topics on algorithms and more 'hardware friendly' techniques...

 

With computer science ( I am in the 4th year of a bachelors course  of BCS ) you will learn less math than an engineer but will focus on more theoretical concepts, like how to do compilers, how to develop some advanced AI algorithms, some Graphical Computer ( much theory about rasterization, image processing, a little about 3d and so on ).

 

Btw, its recommended you check the course Curriculum and check the classes you will have.... both areas are great as a starting point for a good academic career, like a research or teacher or even a employee of a tech research company...

 

 

BUT, if you are looking for a bachelor degree just to have a 'superior grade' in your curriculum... so.. the course does not matter... the companies search for a 'area based course'.. so.. any course related to computers, or maths you do the job... pick the lightest course and/or the one you like more the classes...

 

well... I still think spending 4 years in a course just to be employed is a waste of time... unfortunately its my case... I am working as a programmer for about 15 years now... and.. to get a good job, I mean... a good position in my job I need a bachelor degree... so... I spend my last 4 years doing a Bachelor Course... SO I realized that maybe being a researcher, or a teacher more regarding than working in private industry... ( not in a $$ way.. but for personal satisfaction )

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