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Pricing a side-scroller game!

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So I making Side-Scroller game. I need advice on pricing. How much? $1 any good for a IOS (possibly even AD)?
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Never do 1$ ! Do 0.99$ :P

but seriously, alsways use those .99's because people will usually calculate the cost rounding down, and will with higher chance buy your game.

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Never do 1$ ! Do 0.99$ tongue.png

but seriously, alsways use those .99's because people will usually calculate the cost rounding down, and will with higher chance buy your game.

 

$1.99 is better then :)

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I very much dislike the way the industry has been moving to all Free to Play and micro transactions in the background.

 

Consumers are really shooting themselves in the foot by pushing developers into doing this.

 

It makes the developers focus on how to get money from you all over the place, rather than focusing on great content and playability. I am talking about MMOs of course, but the same applies to APPs.

 

We will soon be releasing a game for Windows Phone 8, Win 8 store, Win RT, Iphones/ipads, and Android Phones/tablets. And with all the games out there that are similar to our game, and are free, we have had no other choice than to make it free, and build micro-transactions into it.

 

It is not the way i wish it would have gone, i would have rather made it $0.99 or $1.99 and have no micro transactions, but now, our team has to spend time, figuring out ways to monetize a free game.

 

it is all a lie, but sadly that's the way the market has somewhat been moving.

 

We are also building an MMO, in this case, we are not going to let all those free to play MMOs out there push us around. We are going with a free mode which has great limitations, and you get to play the real thing with a $12/month subscription.

 

With no micro transactions.

 

/stopping rant

 

I would recommend you look at what other games are similar to yours and what they are doing, and figure out how to improve the monetizing model if possible.

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Just to maybe bring this back around, its absolutely true basically everyone is forced into a freemium, micro-transaction, or advertising-based revenue model. In large part for the reasons I mentioned, but also in large part because of Android (which suffers the same visibility/over-saturation problems as iOS), where side-loading cracked applications (piracy) is too easy and common for devs to make money on an initial sale of an app on that platform -- To make money on android, you can't expect to make money on the initial sale, to make money post-sale, you need to design your game around that, and if your game is cross-platform to iOS and elsewhere, then your app monetizes the same way everywhere. Unfortunately, its simply the way that the herd is moving, and when the herd really gets moving you've got no real choice, in this instance, but to go along or just get trampled underfoot.

 

With that being said, the vast majority of the herd is the absolute last place I'd look for inspiration on how to execute freemium models or micro-transactions well. Sadly, there are far fewer companies and games that do freemium well, than there are who make enough money at it to keep the lights on. Many games are designed around exploitative mechanics which 'force' users to make frequent purchases of consumable goods to continue competing or progressing, others exploit the kind of flaws you find in those who have gambling addictions. You cannot absolve the player from their part in playing the willing victim, but still those kinds of monetizations aren't especially good for players or the industry. There are those few who do it well, who offer value for money and where purchases and traded virtual goods enhance the play experience for everyone, rather than simply buying a shortcut or unfair advantage (Some of the popular MOBAs are good at this).

 

The point I'm pushing at is that just because we are unfortunately pushed into a model that's not based on the initial sale, doesn't' necessarily mean that we have to stoop to exploitative mechanics or pervert our core gameplay in support of that. You can, in fact, design a freemium game in which your players are perfectly happy to participate in your ecosystem, and to receive good value for doing so.

 

Valve gave a really great talk at Steam Dev Days last month, entitled In-Game Economies in Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2 which I would highly recommend you to watch if you're interested in how to design freemium games that players love to participate in economically.

 

Speaking of Steam, if you really can't imagine your side-scroller as a freemium title of any kind (or DLC or Ad-supported), then perhaps the answer is that its not a good fit for the iOS or Android ecosystems. Steam, and to a lesser extent the Windows Store or other online storefronts for PC games, is one of the last bastions of the sticker-price model that is ubiquitous and accessible. 

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Valve gave a really great talk at Steam Dev Days last month, entitled In-Game Economies in Team Fortress 2 and Dota 2 which I would highly recommend you to watch if you're interested in how to design freemium games that players love to participate in economically.
 
Speaking of Steam, if you really can't imagine your side-scroller as a freemium title of any kind (or DLC or Ad-supported), then perhaps the answer is that its not a good fit for the iOS or Android ecosystems. Steam, and to a lesser extent the Windows Store or other online storefronts for PC games, is one of the last bastions of the sticker-price model that is ubiquitous and accessible. 

There are some mobile games that do offer the "unlock everything for full sticker price" option.

 

I played one last year, a space shooter, where you could open all the worlds and premium trade items for $25. Since I had already played about 3 hours and was certain I was going to invest quite a few more hours, so I paid the full cost rather than a slightly more expensive nickle-and-dime scenario for individual unlocks. I ended up playing the game almost exclusively for around 3 months before tiring of it, so for me it was a great entertainment value.

 

Sure, some games have insane unlocks and expensive "buy some of everything" IAP options to extract money, but others are much more like the traditional game model. I try to support the latter, and make it a point to thank developers for offering that option when I see it in a game.

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Perfectly agreed frob :)

 

There are games out there with this kind of model -- I'd say this is more DLC + Bundle than Freemium. I just wanted to make the point that most peole think of the bad kind of freemium when they think about games that don't charge a cover price, and rightly have a knee-jerk reaction over it. There's so many good options to explore and find what's right for your game, I would hope that the OP can embrace that, rather than hanging up his hat early because he's convinced that having a sticker price is the only way to stay "pure" as a game developer.

 

I've seen this unfortunate reaction in other ways -- for example, when an indie game developer gives into having a DLC or freemium-supported title, but feels bad about it and decides that the way out of the moral quandary they've put themselves in is to make sure the game can be completed without ever having paid a thing, if the player want's to grind enough. To that I say BULLSHIT -- we've all gotta eat and keep the lights on, so get creative and find a way to make money that fits with your game and that you feel good about, and don't be afraid to say no to the naysayers who say your game has to work in a certain way so that they can grind it out for free.

 

Go build the game where half-or-more of your 10k players are spending a buck or two a month, rather than the game where half your revenue comes from 2% of your players, and 90% never spend a dime -- the former is a market that's largely under-served. 

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Go build the game where half-or-more of your 10k players are spending a buck or two a month, rather than the game where half your revenue comes from 2% of your players, and 90% never spend a dime -- the former is a market that's largely under-served. 

 

I agree with you, we are building an MMO (it hasn't been announced yet) that will allow certain free play, but if you like the game you really have to signup for the subscription model. Kinda like they used to do back in the shareware days.

 

A huge amount of effort goes into what we are doing now, and what we will have to do once the game goes live, so there is no way we can give it away for free. We currently have a plan where we want guarantee the game's life for at least 10 years.

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