• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Ryan_001

MS Access question

6 posts in this topic

I'm not sure if this is the right spot for this question, but the Access forums I've found online have been pretty poor, and you guys seem to be a pretty knowledgeable bunch, so I thought I'd ask here : )

 

I'm helping a family member with a database that's already been made in Access 2010.  I'm attempting to add data to TableA from another TableB, but I need to be able to show a 'Are you sure you wish to save changes' type dialog.  So I need to know if there are any differences between TableA and TableB.  The approach I was taking was to compare Count(TableA), Count(TableB), Count(TableA intersect TableB).  If all 3 counts were equal then no update has to be made, otherwise I have to perform an update.  I tried a bunch of different queries with varying success rates.

 

The main problem I have bumped into is that in some circumstances identical rows do not compare equal.  I've taken a table and copied/pasted it with nothing changed and then performed the intersection on the 2 seemingly identical tables, and some (but not all) of the rows do not compare equal to their counterpart.  I've inspected the tables visually, and as far as I can see nothing that was changed on the copy/paste.  Now I didn't just copy the rows, but I copied/pasted the full tables in design mode, structure/layout and data, to ensure that they were identical.

 

So this has left me rather stumped.  I'm admittedly an access 'noob' (the majority of my programming experiencing being with in C/C++), so perhaps I'm missing something.  Chances are this is not the 'optimal' why to do things, and by all means if you know of alternate methods I'm all ears, but that said I am helping a family member (ie. this is not my project) and hence they might not be conducent to large changes.

 

My rather noob-ish attempt at an intersection SQL query is here:

SELECT a.*
FROM TableA AS a, TableB AS b
WHERE (
a.[Staff Member]=b.[Staff Member] AND
a.[Day ID]=b.[Day ID] AND
a.[Shift Date]=b.[Shift Date] AND
a.[Start Time]=b.[Start Time] AND
a.[End Time]=b.[End Time] AND
a.[Duration]=b.[Duration] AND
a.[Position]=b.[Position] AND
a.[Shift Status]=b.[Shift Status] AND
a.[Wage]=b.[Wage] AND
a.[Medical Review]=b.[Medical Review] AND
a.[Comments]=b.[Comments]);
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's been a while since I've done a query in 2010. However, I think I remember there being quirks with comparing memo fields. Don't know if your medical review and/or comments fits in that category. If that's where you're having differences, then you may have to read the memo field into another format (I can't remember what I used, sorry) and do a comparison there.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes comments is a memo.  How do I change its format in a query?  Thanks for the advice non-the-less, it'll give me something more specific to google against than just 'OMG ACCESS NO DOES WORK!!!' ; )

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes comments is a memo.  How do I change its format in a query?  Thanks for the advice non-the-less, it'll give me something more specific to google against than just 'OMG ACCESS NO DOES WORK!!!' ; )

laugh.png  Been there.

 

To the best of my knowledge, you can't change field types in a query. That's the problem. However, if the comment field is the only difference, hopefully it's just a matter of looking at the field in both tables. At the time I had the problem, I was big into Access Basic so I wrote a comparison routine and dumped bad comparisons to a text file or something. Sounds like that's probably not a good option for you.

 

I don't have suggestions beyond that, Ryan. sad.png

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I figured it out.  Some of my fields were 'null' and it seems null != null....

 

Just a slight clarification in case there is any real bewilderment: null in databases marks a missing/unknown/non-applicable value - hence null can never match with another null as we don't have anything tangible to compare there at the given time. Null is a touchy subject as far as databases go, but my rule-of-thumb is that no field should ever allow null without a bloody good reason.

Edited by tanzanite7
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0