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Mulahey

Feedback on my music

7 posts in this topic

Hi there,

 

my name is Dustin and I am from a small town next to Cologne, Germany. I started venturing into the world of music as late as the age of eleven when I got my first piano lessons. Right from the start I wanted to play some stuff from my favourite movies and after a while a tried to compose my own modest little tunes. Apart from that, me and brother always loved to fool around with a camcorder and to produce our own embarrasing flicks. I found the most enjoyable part of the process was putting music to the picture. After a while I became curious to apply some self-made music and started some experimentation.

However, I never really considered a career in the film industry or something alike since besides music I have another huge interest in science, especially life science. This resulted in the choice to study biology and chemistry (as well as to minor in music pedagogy).

 

Despite the fact that I'm not aiming to write music for a living, I invest a large part of my scarce leisure time to compose, using sequencer plus some software synthesizers and a notation program. For piano solos I take an analogue approach. I am very curious to know what you think of my stuff here and eager to learn more! It's just for the fun of it and platforms such as youtube and soundclick are great tools of presenting it to a wider public. Glad if you enjoy my pieces, if not: please say so. I really appreciate any comment, either commendation or critique.

 

http://www.soundclick.com/bands/page_music.cfm?bandID=674265

 

My latest big ensemble composition:

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1JjRaLCdjk

 

I hope you like some of the pieces. Would be great to hear your opinion.

 

Have fun!

 

Dustin  

Edited by nsmadsen
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Wow, Eifgen Dale at Dawn (piano) is very beautiful.
 
My own RPG project isn't far enough along to be seeking out more composers (and I have at least one already), but I'll definitely keep you in-mind when I get farther along. I seriously love me some good piano! Night Falls on the Old Castle is pretty nice also.
 
I wouldn't recommend joining a project that is merely at the "design" (i.e. day-dream) stage, unless someone is paying you cash up-front. Far too many projects never make it to completion - or even close. Until someone has something to show that is actually playable, it is best to stay away unless they at least give a down-payment (Also, stay away from promises of "shares" or "percentages" of "future profits", if you want my advice). It doesn't harm a game's development for developers to use placeholder/temporary music until the game is actually farther along.
 
Don't sell yourself for nothing; you, and your music, is definitely worth more. At the very least consider it as some extra cash to upgrade your equipment and buy more music-related toys.
An exception would be a project that is entirely opensource and free - but anything where anyone else on the team stands to make some money, you should get paid as well. And not paid in imaginary "future" money either. Edited by Servant of the Lord
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I really like it.  I would just recommend that to make it more "epic" that you have the quarter note - triplet motif do some sort of development in the open chordal area in the middle where nothing is happening (1:35 to 1:55).

 

I'd also do a lot more call and response to that motif throughout the song, and add some melodic counterpoint (maybe in the french horns?) playing off the melody when you return to it at 2:21.

 

Enjoyed listening, thanks for sharing!

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Hey there Dustin!

 

Welcome to the forums - glad to have you here. Since the Classified sections is the only spot where you can actively look for jobs or hobbyist projects, I've edited your post to better align with the Music and Sound forum's guidelines. We're all about discussion, sharing and feedback here.

 

Thanks!

 

Nate

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Thanks for your feedback and the tips, that helps a lot! And I am glad that you like it :-) @ ddrummerman: yes, you're right about the triplet motif. In the piano transcription I did exactly that: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TypTaDVoBbM

 

By this time I finally got the chance to score my first little short film. You can check it out here: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pMrSCqL6dBo

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Your classic film music style is very enjoyable. I'd love to hear what you do with a real orchestra! Keep up the good work.

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Needs woodwinds runs! It aint 'swashbucklin' in my books until it's got some tasty piccolo features. biggrin.png

Nice job man. 

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