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StealthPandemic

Is GameMaker any good?

25 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I am a new developer. I was wondering IF game maker was any good? I'm a new developer and i would not like to use Unity or any other complex engine. Could anyone confirm (or answer) these questions:?

 

1. Can i use Programming languages (HTML, Java, etc)

2. Can you import Background images from say photoshop

3. Can we design our own character in like other modeling software?

4. Can you have cutscenes?

5. Can i publish with the free version on like Steam?

6. Is this a good way to start off career in the industry?

7. Does it have IOS and Android publishing? Cost?

8. Is their Xbox One publishing?

 

What are some examples of popular games made with GM!?

Edited by StealthPandemic
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1) yes they have their own language

6) vlambeer is doing quite well http://www.vlambeer.com

Game maker is a nice tool for 2D games, but it's not gonna land you a job anywhere fancy.. But then again no single engine will do that. Make a super game and take it from there. And for that vlambeer have proved that it works great. Check out ridiculous fishing if you want to see what game maker is great at.
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I would say it is a good way to start out, there is a low barrier to entry, it's possible to make good quality games on it (see Gunpoint & Hotline Miami), it has it's own scripting language which you don't need to use but you can if you want to take things further, any design skills will be transferable should you feel like GameMaker is no longer suitable for your needs. etc.

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1) yes they have their own language

6) vlambeer is doing quite well http://www.vlambeer.com

Game maker is a nice tool for 2D games, but it's not gonna land you a job anywhere fancy.. But then again no single engine will do that. Make a super game and take it from there. And for that vlambeer have proved that it works great. Check out ridiculous fishing if you want to see what game maker is great at.

 

He mentioned specific languages, and languages plurals... Unless they have updated that since I used it, no they can't. They have their own scripting language, but that's all they have. (just checked, they have support for HTML5)

 

And for the price, no it isn't a good thing to start with or really use. You are wasting money to give to an inferior product. Any one that needs it would do much better to use basic javascript + CSS or HTML5 or learn a language to make a basic text based game than using it and anyone that just wants a tool to make things simpler, there are much better and cheaper options out there.

 

But over all, DL the free version, see if you like what you see and decide for yourself... Though I would suggest a much better option is simply, instead, grab its tutorials and you can use them to construct the game in python or C++ or anything else, and that would serve you much better.

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1) yes they have their own language

6) vlambeer is doing quite well http://www.vlambeer.com

Game maker is a nice tool for 2D games, but it's not gonna land you a job anywhere fancy.. But then again no single engine will do that. Make a super game and take it from there. And for that vlambeer have proved that it works great. Check out ridiculous fishing if you want to see what game maker is great at.

 

He mentioned specific languages, and languages plurals... Unless they have updated that since I used it, no they can't. They have their own scripting language, but that's all they have. (just checked, they have support for HTML5)

 

And for the price, no it isn't a good thing to start with or really use. You are wasting money to give to an inferior product. Any one that needs it would do much better to use basic javascript + CSS or HTML5 or learn a language to make a basic text based game than using it and anyone that just wants a tool to make things simpler, there are much better and cheaper options out there.

 

But over all, DL the free version, see if you like what you see and decide for yourself... Though I would suggest a much better option is simply, instead, grab its tutorials and you can use them to construct the game in python or C++ or anything else, and that would serve you much better.

 

 

Game Maker HTML5 can use JavaScript, and it is also possible to write extensions for it. GML is also fairly powerful and can do quite a bit of things.

 

The price is cheap for the product compared to the cost of developing a game. For example Game Maker Standard is $50. Professional is $100. For $800 you get a ton of features including IOS, Android, HTML5, Ubuntu, Windows Phone 8, Windows, and Mac platform support. If that is too pricey then the modules are sold individually as well ($200 for Android export is not expensive IMO). If Game Maker is so "inferior" and if there are better/cheaper options out there, please suggest the superior options.

 

Using Game Maker is perfectly valid and I feel it is a great way to start out. I started out many years ago using similar programs (although less powerful!).

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Game Maker HTML5 can use JavaScript, and it is also possible to write extensions for it. GML is also fairly powerful and can do quite a bit of things.

 

The price is cheap for the product compared to the cost of developing a game. For example Game Maker Standard is $50. Professional is $100. For $800 you get a ton of features including IOS, Android, HTML5, Ubuntu, Windows Phone 8, Windows, and Mac platform support. If that is too pricey then the modules are sold individually as well ($200 for Android export is not expensive IMO). If Game Maker is so "inferior" and if there are better/cheaper options out there, please suggest the superior options.

 

Using Game Maker is perfectly valid and I feel it is a great way to start out. I started out many years ago using similar programs (although less powerful!).

 

 

HTML5 without javascript isn't HTML5. GML is it's own script.

 

Unity free

RPG maker is better for at least RPGs

 

I'm sure if I looked around I could find more, but for the price and for what it allows you to do it just isn't worth the money. It's inferior overall as there are others do the same and better.

 

As far as it being valid. Sure, it just isn't worth the money, at least from my point of view. I got it a long time ago when it was much cheaper and the license somehow vanished. The licensing is cheaper than unity, more expensive than RPGmaker. The abilities are greater than RPG maker, less than unity. You can learn with it, but the things you'd need to advance with it requires you to purchase it so it's better just to go to something else...and if you're going to use something else you might as well start with something else.

 

It's a valid way to start, but it seems to me it's just a waste of time to learn that system and then have to learn something else to advance rather than building on what you already know.

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When I think of game maker, I think of Hotline Miami... Can't save on my linux machine, but it certainly is good.
There is also Home, Risk of Rain, a version of Spelunky, Valdis Story...

Game Maker is a professional grade tool. Edited by dejaime
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GameMaker is a perfectly fine tool to start with, I also started with it myself... smile.png

 

Here are some things GameMaker is good at:

  • Creating games fast. GameMaker is still the best tool I know for creating a lot of "simple" different games fast, even though there are some alternatives that I haven't tried yet.
  • Letting people learn. There is no steep learning curve involved as you can even start using the D&D interface.
  • Focusing on game desgn. Using the build-in room editor and some simple scripts / D&D actions you can easily start designing levels without much experience.

Some bad things about GameMaker:

  • Speed. Many kinds of games can be created using GameMaker, but don't expect to write a fast working game with too fancy graphics compared to some other engines.
  • Networking. Even though the GML (GameMaker language) was made to be easy-to-use, in many situations you could have made a very nice interface for industrial languages like C++, while you have to do things manually using GML.
  • 3D graphics. They have a nice 2D room editor, but the 3D functions suck and I don't advice to create any 3D games using GameMaker at all.
  • Learning programming. Even though the language is simple, it is too simple in my opinion. Lua is even more complex than it at some things. The language doesn't has syntax for e.g. functions, classes, and many other things. This is obviously okay for "simple" games, but if you are planning to learn another language it may not be the best start.
  • Team collaboration. Even though the studio version works a lot better, using Git with any other language is in my eyes still superior.

GameMaker is like dejaime said a professional grade tool, but for a limited amount of games. GameMaker can be great for especially indie games publishing on for example mobile platforms. You can create games fast and you won't need too much experience. Depending on your goal, which you haven't really made clear, you may not even notice the down-sides I mentioned.

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Its awesome. Many commercial games are made with it. Its the easiest game engine for beginners.If you are just starting out then you can buy this book
http://unluckystudio.com/gamemakerforbeginnersbook/
Its just 4.99$ only

Coupon code : MONITHEROCKSTAR

and you will get it for 3.99$

You should still note that these commercial games are all of a certain quality that can easily be compared to most web games in my opinion...

 

And is clearly self promoting allowed on gamedev.net?

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It's certainly not a dev system i would like to be recommended to use/recommend someone to use (and a price tag makes it worse) when there is a better, freer, more useful, powerful and helpful unity or unreal engine.
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Unreal and Crytek's new licensing models are going to change a lot of things in the gaming industry - about time too, PC Gaming needed a swift kick in the ass.

 

I'm using RPG Maker VX Ace for my first project. It uses Ruby (or a subset of it at least) for its scripting language. Is it limited? You bet. There's lots of things I want to do but can't because it's buried in the engine code - but I'm still sticking with it because it's letting me build my game. I forget what I paid for it - it doesn't have mobile support which should've been a no-brainer for the guys @ Degica/EB - a cheap 2D engine when everybody was out trying to make the next Angry Birds? Easy money.

 

I don't know enough about Game Maker to say good or bad things about it. You've got to get your feet wet somewhere, and I think there's a lot to be said for having a _finished_ product behind you. If it's a good finished product, that's a bonus. If you're going to stick with game development it's pretty much a given that your first game engine won't be your last.

 

As far as getting a foot in the door in the industry? Make something good. Focus on that and it will show through no matter what you build it with. In the movie industry you get about three sentences to pitch a script. Having a 'lesser' tool may help force you to 'cut the cruft' and get down to the basics of what your game different. If you can make a good game with a 'sub-par' engine, then you know you can make a great game with a better one - so get a better one and make an even better game: lather, rinse, repeat and you'll get noticed. But if you can't make a good game, all the tools and bells and whistles and shinies in the world won't help you.

 

Making a game is like learning to play a guitar or anything else - it takes time, practice, and dedication to get good at it.

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For 2d games, I don't think it can be beat at all by much of anything, unless price or graphics features are the only factors.  Consider this.  Unity has the free version, which I admit is really good, especially for free.  For 3d games, it is probably the best in general free thing to use.  But for 2d, not so much.  Unity's 2d is pretty far behind GMStudio's capabilities . . .
Unity will be harder to get started with, but you can do so for free.
The biggest "feature" of GMStudio is generally how quick and easy to get things done it is with it, combined with the capability to do pretty much whatever you want via the scripting(GML) and shader implementation, combined with the multi-platform support it provides.  The amount of platforms it supports at the moment is massive.  It has all of the major ones, and a few minor ones too.  In fact, except for consoles, it supports more platforms that Unity does.

Really? GM supports more platforms at what price? How much harder is it to get started with unity?
Generally, unity is good for 2d, 3d and in-between (i.e. 2.5d), supports more platforms for less than GM's (2d wise). And when he wants to try 3d (or mix 3d with 2d), he doesn't need to change engines or pay.
My advice, try unity 2d and game maker (you don't need to pay to start with one) and then you can make your choice.
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For 2d games, I don't think it can be beat at all by much of anything, unless price or graphics features are the only factors.  Consider this.  Unity has the free version, which I admit is really good, especially for free.  For 3d games, it is probably the best in general free thing to use.  But for 2d, not so much.  Unity's 2d is pretty far behind GMStudio's capabilities . . .
Unity will be harder to get started with, but you can do so for free.
The biggest "feature" of GMStudio is generally how quick and easy to get things done it is with it, combined with the capability to do pretty much whatever you want via the scripting(GML) and shader implementation, combined with the multi-platform support it provides.  The amount of platforms it supports at the moment is massive.  It has all of the major ones, and a few minor ones too.  In fact, except for consoles, it supports more platforms that Unity does.

Really? GM supports more platforms at what price? How much harder is it to get started with unity?
Generally, unity is good for 2d, 3d and in-between (i.e. 2.5d), supports more platforms for less than GM's (2d wise). And when he wants to try 3d (or mix 3d with 2d), he doesn't need to change engines or pay.
My advice, try unity 2d and game maker (you don't need to pay to start with one) and then you can make your choice.

 

 

That is why I mentioned the price at the beginning.  I also forgot to mention the part about using 3d later.  Usually I mention that if someone would be interested in doing 3d later, that Unity would be better to learn even if only for 2d at the moment.  But besides consoles, what "more platforms" does Unity support of GMStudio?

 

Considering this, if you only want 2d, I'd agree with the recommendation to try both.  But if you would be interested in 3d at a later point, for sure put more attention to Unity.

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Wasn't 'I wanna be the guy' or the guy games done in GM? Those things are pieces of troll art. :)
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I've been using GM since I was about seven (11 years ago), and I've always loved it. For 2D games, it can't be beat. If you want to make 3D games, well...it's not so great in that department, without the use of DLLs, and you'll have a hard time finding those for GM:Studio. However, I think that Game Maker is a great way to learn about programming before moving on to a more complicated language. Lots of people will say that GM can't do anything, but it really is pretty powerful. If you wanna see a little bit of what it can do, here's some commercial games that were made with GM:

 

Gunpoint (http://store.steampowered.com/app/206190/) <-- Really fun, this one

Spelunky (http://store.steampowered.com/app/239350/)

Miami Hotline (http://store.steampowered.com/app/219150/)

 

Overall, it's fun, easy to use, fast, and pretty powerful. Once you've mastered GML, you'll be ready for pretty much any other language.

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Spelunky (http://store.steampowered.com/app/239350/)

Just a minor correction, in case anyone think Spelunky was made in Game Maker from our posts, the game that was made in Game Maker is actually the Spelunky Classic. It is free and open source (source available here). This linked Steam version is a complete reboot of the old game maker one, and never touched Game Maker.

 

But, as the author said... well, read Item 3 of this (extremelly relevant) article and see for yourselves.

Edited by dejaime
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Sorry Mate!! For that promotional activity. I will never do that again. But Game Maker Studio is great for beginners. You don't need any programming experience. There are lots of step-by step tutorials available and plus cross platform support. You can easily create 2d games with it. price is also lesser than others. But the main point is its great learning curve.

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