• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
fir

what potentially usable info can i ask system (windows) for?

3 posts in this topic

I wonder what potentialy usable info can i ask windows for later 

potentially use in game?

I liked the tricks for example game detected that it is x-mas day

or 1 april and acted differently..

I also wonder if some hardware benchmarking about display haracteristics/cpu/disk?

could be used - and how?

What could be usable or fun to use?

 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably the most useful things are:

 

- Use their desktop resolution to automatically pick a default resolution to run the game in.

- Use their graphics card info to pick default quality settings.

- Use their speaker configuration to pick the default number of audio channels.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I think information on the location of passwords could be fun to know. biggrin.png

 

A bit more serious would be to check for example the internet speed for a network game.


I also wonder if some hardware benchmarking about display haracteristics/cpu/disk?

could be used - and how?

There are some games, of which I don't know the names, that ran a benchmark when the game first started. The game would test your graphics and computing speed to set the default settings. It would be easier however to use the GPU and CPU information like Nypuren suggested.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The current year is 2014. Please live in it.

2+ decades ago it was often necessary to either have the user enter configuration values or have the software probe the system, in an attempt to determine which hardware to use. Game developers would buy and use libraries that solved common problems at the time. There were dozens of audio hardware configurations, and if you probed them in the wrong order it could crash certain machines. There were a large number of graphics cards and they quickly converged on the VESA standard, but some cards had better performance with certain algorithms than others, so third-party libraries would run some tests on them. Some cheap cards reported identical information were actually poor knock-offs that crashed or otherwise misbehaved.

Game developers didn't run all those diagnostics for fun. They ran those diagnostics because they were required to give a good game experience.

You also ask about specific dates, Christmas and April Fools Day. Those are easter eggs. Include them if you want, just recognize you are spending development time on a feature that will be seen much less than 1% of the time. Most studios realized they were mostly a waste of time and spent the development effort on real features.

These days we have standard systems that are much higher quality. Since you are on Windows, take advantage of those functions. You don't need to probe to see which audio card is supported, probe to see if you need specific ATA commands. If the interface is available it is acceptable to use.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0