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Taking the next step

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Hi, Okay, so I have gone through the Sams Teach yourself in 24 hours and done all the quizes in the sams teach yourself 21 days book. Excellant I thought however when I have sat down to write a program I have stumped. I want to write an House Alarm simulation. I made a note of everything I wanted in it like how many doors, windows and sensors etc.. However when I came to start working out the classes I just can''t get started and its so frustrating because I understand everything just cannot seem to put into practise for doing a simple program. Any help or guidlines on how to move on from a book''s examples to using them into problems you design for a program primarily using classes would be appreciated. SpriterZ.

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What I would suggest you is a better planning.
Planning is a very important aspect when you are about to do a big program.

Try to start a flow chart diagram about your program

Example (I cant display it graphically)
Init -> Main Function -> Input -> ...

Try to do every aspect again in more detail.
Then you should write down what every function needs to be able to do. (start with little things, you can always add things later).
If you have done all the planning start writing your code.
AT the beginning keep it as simple and self-explainatory as possible. If your program works WITHOUT ANY erros, then you can start add the difficult things, but after every new implementation test it for errors and data validation.

Obviously you are using classes with encapsulation.
If you need help with advanced classes try THINK IN C++ 2ND EDITION - it is a great book all about classes.}

Good Luck



Windows (N): A 32 Bit patch to a 16 bit graphical interface based on a 8 bit operating system originaly encoded for a 4 bit processor written by a 2 bit company that can''''t stand 1 bit of competition.

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