Advertisement Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
welly_59

ive made a simple pong, what next?

This topic is 1763 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

ive been learning c# and monogame for a while now but have recently(yesterdat) moved to unity. Ive created a simple pong game, using some simple ai for the computer player, implemented a scoreboard and created a simple menu.

 

what next from here? would you say i should carry on with this game for a bit ie add sound effects, options(ai difficulty) etc or move onto something else?

 

my c# knowledge is pretty limited right now, but not as limited as my knowledge of unity!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

what im asking i suppose is what you would you reccomend i do to improve my c# while also improving my unity skills

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I would not try to get a better understanding of a language (build a routine using it) by developing a game.

I'd probably go for solving Google Code Jam problems ... or similar coding challenges with C# and then return to learning game development with Unity.

 

IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.

Edited by DareDeveloper

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.

Would a pacman game be a good fit him?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
All very valid points and I'll take them on board.

I am writing through a couple of c# books to supplement my learning, and switch to a unity project once my brain is full for the day :)

I've never heard of or taken part in Google code jams, so that's a very good idea that I'll take on board and research

Thanks

I guess I would not try to get a better understanding of a language (build a routine using it) by developing a game.
I'd probably go for solving Google Code Jam problems ... or similar coding challenges with C# and then return to learning game development with Unity.
 
IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It depends on what you're doing...

 

If you want to be a better designer, take that pong game and try to make it unique and still be good...

If you want to be a better programmer, try doing it or something similar without any tutorial...

 

If you've done either of those, then do I guess Pacman... then do the above with Pacman...

Or ignore all that, write down what you want to do in your own game, find a simple variation of those mechanics. Learn from the tutorial, then implement into your game... and just continue finding what you want to do, learning it, and implementing it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

ive been learning c# and monogame for a while now but have recently(yesterdat) moved to unity. Ive created a simple pong game, using some simple ai for the computer player, implemented a scoreboard and created a simple menu.

 

what next from here? would you say i should carry on with this game for a bit ie add sound effects, options(ai difficulty) etc or move onto something else?

 

my c# knowledge is pretty limited right now, but not as limited as my knowledge of unity!

 

Language proficiency aside, you could try to make Breakout next.

 

You should move on when you feel confident you've mastered the challenges involved in making the game, e.g. AI, math, graphics, animation, input, state management, and so on. You'll need those skills, and more, on your next, more complex game.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I guess I would not try to get a better understanding of a language (build a routine using it) by developing a game.

I'd probably go for solving Google Code Jam problems ... or similar coding challenges with C# and then return to learning game development with Unity.

 

IMO what you want to get better at is using data structures and algorithms efficiently in C# ... and with the ones you need for game logic you might not get the best mileage out of your endeavours.

This is fairly wrong. If he wants to develop games, he should be working on his game development skills. Unless he's making large, 3D games, he won't need Algorithms (unless you count things like Sweep and Prune, but at the same time, those won't be needed unless you have a very complex 2D game). Data Structures are an integral part of C#, and I'd be surprised if he couldn't work his way around Arrays, Queues, and Stacks.

 

What he needs to do is make games. That's how you get better, it's a proven technique.

 

To the Original Poster: I made Breakout after Pong, for me it was a natural transition. Maybe you can try that too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This article is probably one in the list of most linked articles: 

http://www.gamedev.net/page/resources/_/technical/game-programming/your-first-step-to-game-development-starts-here-r2976

 

Has this nice list of games to make:

 

 

  • Pong = Simple: input, physics, collision detection, sound; scoring
  • Worm = Placement of random powerups, handling of screen boundaries, worm data structure
  • Breakout = Lessons of pong, powerups, maps (brick arrangements)
  • Missile Command = targeting; simple enemy ai, movement, and sound
  • Space Invaders = simple movement for player and enemy, very similar to breakout with the exception that the enemy constantly moves downward, simple sound
  • Asteroids = asteroids (enemies) and player can move in all directions, asteroids appear and move randomly, simple sound
  • Tetris = block design, clearing the lines, scoring, simple animation
  • Pac Man = simple animation, input, collision detection, maps (level design), ai
  • Ikari Warriors = top down view, enemy ai, powerups, scoring, collision detection, maps (level design), input, sound, boss ai
  • Super Mario Bros = lessons of Ikari Warriors (except with side-view instead of top-down view), acceleration, jumping, platforms

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement
×

Important Information

By using GameDev.net, you agree to our community Guidelines, Terms of Use, and Privacy Policy.

GameDev.net is your game development community. Create an account for your GameDev Portfolio and participate in the largest developer community in the games industry.

Sign me up!