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RalemProductions

PC developers... Steam Pulling plug from Greenlight? Fact and Fiction

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Good point. We are looking to publish on Greenlight, but it may not be the best. Should an indie dev bother putting up $100 to go on the forums as it lasts, or would it be bad press to "not get greenlit?"

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They don't think that Greenlight is the best solution though. So, they want to change things so that eventually anyone can sell their game on Steam without requiring any approval or oversight, without going through any kind of Greenlighting process or having to negotiate any publishing deals.

They're taking their time figuring out how to do this though.

 

They're already doing it; which is why the storefront has now been inundated with a vast quantity of sub-par games; mostly games that got review scores of 5/10 (or less) and flopped 10+ years ago, and particularly poor home made entries that could have been made in GameMaker in a weekend are now finding their way into the store thanks to opening up the system to a number of small scale publishers.

 

Greenlight's user-based curation actually worked better in that regard. I find the Steam storefront a frustrating mess at present.

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Good point. We are looking to publish on Greenlight, but it may not be the best. Should an indie dev bother putting up $100 to go on the forums as it lasts, or would it be bad press to "not get greenlit?"

Greenlight is a good source for pr thing at the moment. It is good to have an official page for the game on Steam. And even if they decide to open the gates completely I can in no way possibly imagine that this will happen for a fee lower than $100. Keep in mind that the fee for the app store is $100 a year. For google play it is only $25 as a one time payment.

 

Pretty much no matter what the $100 will not be wasted - valve are not the kind of people I would imagine "stealing" from poor indies smile.png

 

 

Also Rami from Vlambeer was interviewed about this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S-FjZBAJP6g

 

Edit: Greenlight is not a source for pr, but having an official link where people can actively express that they care about the project IS a good idea.

Edited by VildNinja
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Whatever they do, they need to have an upfront cost to keep the rabble out. I'm working on a game I hope to sell using RPG Maker Ace (yes, people can and do make their living selling games made with that - though I'm drooling at the mouth over Epic's new license...). Right now though, there's still such a negative sentiment toward the engine on the Steam boards from the absolute flood of crap that people submitted when Greenlight was free that it's hard to get players past the stigma to actually open their mind and play your game.

 

With Big Fish Games seeming to be turning away from RPG's (and just about anything non HOPA these days) Steam is becoming the major distributor in play. There are other, smaller portals to sell from, and loads of reasons to sell their first (building up a fan base and more revenue per unit sold being the chief two).

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I'm guessing the general direction Valve is wanting to take Steam, is to have people use a Steam "widget" on their own websites to sell their games directly to users, but with users having a central game "library" things get added to.
The Humble Indie Bundle is already going this route: Overgrowth: Alpha preorder page (notice the widget is a Humble Bundle widget that the actual sale goes through, and the game gets added to your Humble Bundle library).
 
I like Steam being curated (and currently, the Greenlight stuff feels less and less curated), because then if my (in-development) game stands out as *higher quality*, being on Steam can get me sales and publicity. But if tons of stuff is on Steam, regardless of quality, then it just becomes as crowded as the smartphone app stores.
You always have to do marketing, but it was previously motivating to know that even just getting on Steam was a guarantee of some level of success.

It's becoming more and more a race-to-the-bottom of pricing (like the app stores), and overcrowded clutter of cheap games with the real gems buried underneath. This is beneficial for stores and publishers (Valve, app stores, consoles), but not for developers. It benefits consumers by very low prices, but also makes it harder to hear about good games unless they get major media attention.

This is still much better than things were ten years ago, but it'd be worse than things were even just three years ago, IMO.
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