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ZeroBit

How do you differs a newbie, intermediate and advance programmer ?

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Just curious about the definition of "newbie" , "advance" and "intermediate". You guys can tell me what you think ?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Newbie = Someone that isn''t familar or proficient at something.
Intermediate = Someone that has used and has a basic knowledge of something.
Advanced = Someone that is proficient and highly skilled/knowledgeable in something.

Billy

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Zerobit has a good question and I''m just as curious. I believe that he actually wanted to know at what skill level point can you call yourself a "newbie" , "advance", or "intermediate"?

For example, I only know half of C++ and I still call myself a newbie.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You''re a newbie until you''ve finished a real project that has some use.

You''re an intermediate until you''ve been promoted to programming lead in your professional life, or done something that requires equivalent skill.

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Some people would say that you can tell how good a programmer is by the data structures he/she uses. That is, if you use arrays exclusively, you could be considered a newbie, but if you use hash tables and AVL trees, you are probably more advanced. I don''t necessarily agree with this, but it''s an interesting thought.

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The more advanced you get, the more appropriate, efficient and effective your designs. Implementations are largely incidental. What I mean is that a newbie will do more work than is necessary because he/she doesn''t understand the processes and techniques; an intermediate user will come up with robust and full-featured designs straight out of theory; an advanced developer will leverage deep knowledge of the intended language, hardware platform and problem domain to reduce the problem solution to nothing short of astounding code.

The vast majority of developers don''t really get beyond advanced stage - highly advanced, but advanced never the less. They also don''t (currently) learn to apply proper software engineering techniques. This makes the demarcations complex, because some developers write near-miraculous code, but ever-so-sloppily (*cough* Carmack *cough*).

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How would one use arrays exclusively? Guess I''m not a newbie.

Newbie: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they don''t.
Intermediate: Designs algorithms that can work, and they don''t.
Advanced: Designs algorithms that can work, and they do.
Master: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they do.

Signatures? We don''t need no steenking signatures!

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quote:
Original post by Mayrel
Newbie: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they don''t.
Intermediate: Designs algorithms that can work, and they don''t.
Advanced: Designs algorithms that can work, and they do.
Master: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they do.


I like! I guess that places me in "Advanced". Yay!

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
I like! I guess that places me in "Advanced". Yay!


I''m mostly ''Advanced'', but sometimes I enter the Zen Master category: my code works even though it can''t, but I''ve no idea why.

Signatures? We don''t need no steenking signatures!

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I found a similar post in gametutorials.com
And here's one of the answer

If I was making a list...

[bold]Advanced[/bold]
STL,Templates
Direct 3D
COM/CORBA
Multithreading(WIN32, POSIX)
API Injection
Security
Compilers/Interpreters (writing)
3D Mathematics
Algorithms
Interprocess Communication

[bold]Intermediate[/bold]
DirectX(everything but D3D)
OpenGL
Networking(sockets)
Generic System Programming
(WIN32,MFC,XLIB,QT...)
Language Questions(Why are references
passed by value in Java?, What does ->*
mean in CPP? )
DLL/Shared Library Questions
File Formats(How do I load a JPG file?)

[bold]Beginner[/bold]
Basic(not BASIC) programming
Setting up development environments
(Why won't VC compile my DX program?)
Beginning graphics programming
(How do I create a Window using WIN32?)

Any problems with anything in any of the categories should be put in those category.


Edited by - ZeroBit on November 1, 2001 5:23:32 PM

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