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ZeroBit

How do you differs a newbie, intermediate and advance programmer ?

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Newbie = Someone that isn''t familar or proficient at something.
Intermediate = Someone that has used and has a basic knowledge of something.
Advanced = Someone that is proficient and highly skilled/knowledgeable in something.

Billy

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Zerobit has a good question and I''m just as curious. I believe that he actually wanted to know at what skill level point can you call yourself a "newbie" , "advance", or "intermediate"?

For example, I only know half of C++ and I still call myself a newbie.

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Guest Anonymous Poster
You''re a newbie until you''ve finished a real project that has some use.

You''re an intermediate until you''ve been promoted to programming lead in your professional life, or done something that requires equivalent skill.

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Some people would say that you can tell how good a programmer is by the data structures he/she uses. That is, if you use arrays exclusively, you could be considered a newbie, but if you use hash tables and AVL trees, you are probably more advanced. I don''t necessarily agree with this, but it''s an interesting thought.

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The more advanced you get, the more appropriate, efficient and effective your designs. Implementations are largely incidental. What I mean is that a newbie will do more work than is necessary because he/she doesn''t understand the processes and techniques; an intermediate user will come up with robust and full-featured designs straight out of theory; an advanced developer will leverage deep knowledge of the intended language, hardware platform and problem domain to reduce the problem solution to nothing short of astounding code.

The vast majority of developers don''t really get beyond advanced stage - highly advanced, but advanced never the less. They also don''t (currently) learn to apply proper software engineering techniques. This makes the demarcations complex, because some developers write near-miraculous code, but ever-so-sloppily (*cough* Carmack *cough*).

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How would one use arrays exclusively? Guess I''m not a newbie.

Newbie: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they don''t.
Intermediate: Designs algorithms that can work, and they don''t.
Advanced: Designs algorithms that can work, and they do.
Master: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they do.

Signatures? We don''t need no steenking signatures!

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quote:
Original post by Mayrel
Newbie: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they don''t.
Intermediate: Designs algorithms that can work, and they don''t.
Advanced: Designs algorithms that can work, and they do.
Master: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they do.


I like! I guess that places me in "Advanced". Yay!

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quote:
Original post by Oluseyi
I like! I guess that places me in "Advanced". Yay!


I''m mostly ''Advanced'', but sometimes I enter the Zen Master category: my code works even though it can''t, but I''ve no idea why.

Signatures? We don''t need no steenking signatures!

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I found a similar post in gametutorials.com
And here's one of the answer

If I was making a list...

[bold]Advanced[/bold]
STL,Templates
Direct 3D
COM/CORBA
Multithreading(WIN32, POSIX)
API Injection
Security
Compilers/Interpreters (writing)
3D Mathematics
Algorithms
Interprocess Communication

[bold]Intermediate[/bold]
DirectX(everything but D3D)
OpenGL
Networking(sockets)
Generic System Programming
(WIN32,MFC,XLIB,QT...)
Language Questions(Why are references
passed by value in Java?, What does ->*
mean in CPP? )
DLL/Shared Library Questions
File Formats(How do I load a JPG file?)

[bold]Beginner[/bold]
Basic(not BASIC) programming
Setting up development environments
(Why won't VC compile my DX program?)
Beginning graphics programming
(How do I create a Window using WIN32?)

Any problems with anything in any of the categories should be put in those category.


Edited by - ZeroBit on November 1, 2001 5:23:32 PM

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A newbie ask questions without trying to find out why, a freebie or gimme if you will. (Hasn''t paid dues)

An intermediate only ask questions after exhausting all efforts of finding out for him/her self. (Is paying dues)

An advanced just does whatever they feel like because they can. (Has paid dues)


YAP-YFIO

-deadlinegrunt

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quote:
Original post by deadlinegrunt
A newbie ask questions without trying to find out why, a freebie or gimme if you will. (Hasn''t paid dues)

An intermediate only ask questions after exhausting all efforts of finding out for him/her self. (Is paying dues)

An advanced just does whatever they feel like because they can. (Has paid dues)


YAP-YFIO

-deadlinegrunt


Out of all the answers that I''ve read, yours is probably the one that makes the most sense...



"And that''s the bottom line cause I said so!"

Cyberdrek
Headhunter Soft
A division of DLC Multimedia

Resist Windows XP''s Invasive Production Activation Technology!

"gitty up" -- Kramer

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quote:
Original post by Mayrel
Newbie: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they don''t.
Intermediate: Designs algorithms that can work, and they don''t.
Advanced: Designs algorithms that can work, and they do.
Master: Designs algorithms that can''t work, and they do.



I LIKE THAT! That would mean I waver between intermediate and advanced a bit...

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I''ve made a lot of games including isometric and 3d ones with directx but i still consider myself a newbie because of my age...

[Edited by - kmsixpence on October 17, 2005 6:09:39 PM]

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Guest Anonymous Poster
Will I''m a newbie that showing signs of becoming an intermediate programmer although I have a couple of occassion I did something advance. But I can honestly say I''ve never done anything masterful yet. But I do whatever the hell I want so that make me a master?

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Will I''m a newbie that showing signs of becoming an intermediate
programmer although I have a couple of occassion I did
something advance. But I can honestly say I''ve never done
anything masterful yet. But I do whatever the hell I want so
that make me the master of something right?


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Well, maybe some insight here...

Newbie Programmer - Is beginning, not proficent in any language.
Intermediate Programmer- Proficent in one language, and using it on a platform (eg WIN32, MFC, X ect)
Advanced Programmer - Highly proficent in one language, knowledge of other languages, proficent with many API's/Platforms.
Master Programmer - Proficent in multiple languages, platforms, systems...

Real Programmer - Doesn't matter what platform, what language, or API. They know how to learn it if they need it. He/She has mastered the theory of current computer science techniques.

Real Master Programmer - They are advancing the techniques of computer science.

"So much fun, so little time."
~Michael Sikora

Edited by - guardian_light on November 5, 2001 4:58:48 PM

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A Newbie is someone, the even began itself a new thing to dedicate. It is no matter how old he is.
He tries to achieve something, although it knows exactly, it should with something simple begin. In this case for programming. No wonder that it does not work and so he assistance up in a forum. He believes that others make the work, which he would like gladly for him. But forums are there not to do someones work but ro help and for suggestions.

After some time he will get used to the new technics and so he is able to write simple programms. This time he will bi called "Intermediate". Surely help is always needed but he will be able to help others too. But he knows that you can only learn something by doing it and so he will get better.

Passing this time he will get better and better. Programms are structured more and more. Help is just needed in selden cases. Of course nobody is perfect but he knows how to get that help and then he will try as long as he understands it.

This are the main points of getting started with programming. Some people think it is necessary to structure it in more stations but for me it is not necessary.



I know there are also female programmers but it would be more work to write he/she *gg* Sorry, for overflying it *gg*

see ya
Floppi

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I thought I was Advanced, but some are pushing me into Master while others are pushing me into Real Programmer realm... All I can say is that I do what I want when I want, learning what I need. So my final pronouncement, in my new found Master status *drum roll* is...

Classifications are meaningless.

Have a nice day.



I wanna work for Microsoft!

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quote:
Original post by Lowas
An Intermediate statement:

Multiple Inheritance is evil .

Yes, I said it. Sue me! :p That is part of my Masterfulness, that I can consider something less than ideal and yet use it very successfully.

Kneel, knave.

I still think the mixins methodology is an interesting attempt at the resolution of the ambiguities inherent in MI. No one language is perfect, so we''ll always have minor gripes.



I wanna work for Microsoft!

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Guest Anonymous Poster
...well...this would mean I started out as an Intermediate...verrrry interesting...

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Guest Anonymous Poster
quote:
Original post by ZeroBit
Just curious about the definition of "newbie" , "advance" and "intermediate".
You guys can tell me what you think ?


newbie -> just start coding, no planing.

intermediate -> some planing then coding.

advance -> good planing mayby even document then coding.



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