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MARS_999

Linux development...

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I am new to Linux and any development on it.

 

I have a Radeon X1300 GPU, and will be coding C/C++/OpenGL/SDL2 or SFML2

 

I need some recommendations for IDE under Linux.

 

I am running Linux Mint 16...

 

QtCreator? If I remember right the UI wasn't to friendly to get a simple C++ project working....

 

How do I install the latest drivers for this GPU? From what I can tell the latest don't support the X1300?

 

What is X11? Do I need it?

 

I would like to use Irrlicht also but couldn't get that working either.

 

So I am not liking the experience so far... Not trouble free at all....

 

Thanks!

 

Hope to overcome the sour taste of this and enjoy coding on Linux but need some serious help!!!

 

 

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Hi,

 

Using a cross-platform game engine which includes Linux will prevent many problems and thousands of hours of labor.

 

List of Game Engines

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_game_engines

 

Ultimately you must target a runtime environment of some kind.  OpenGL and the other Open APIs are a serious consideration if you don't want to use a game engine. OpenGL is the cross-platform graphics API and comes with a mature and substantial collection of standard and third party coding libraries built for OpenGL. The fact that the USA Defense Department and NASA prefer OpenGL in many cases for cross-platform implementation of their top simulators is on account that their contributors build applications and software on Linux, OS X, and Windows systems in their companies.  Some amazing top graphics software is only available in Linux, so take encouragement that some of the leading software developers prefer Linux.  You can develop on Linux and implement elsewhere if you choose your workflow pipeline carefully. Like I said, a game engine for development in Linux and deploys cross-platform is ideal (and available). 

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Code::Blocks might work for you.

 

Afaik X11 is a low level windowing system technology. I suppose if you use libraries like SDL2 or an engine you will not need to deal with its API directly.

 

I do not remember any kind of programming as trouble free.

Better find the right pace. Trying to accomplish too much at once is usually frustrating ... and develop the resilience to struggle through build issues. They will not just disapear ... ever ... I fear.

 

 

What exactly went wrong when you tried to use Irrlicht?

 

There is a tutorial for Irrlicht and C::B (Code::Blocks) btw. (oops, might be Windows specific, though):

http://irrlicht.sourceforge.net/tut_codeblocks.html

Edited by DareDeveloper

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I still recommend you to give QT Creator another chance, it is really powerdul IDE, you could also use Code::Blocks as DareDeveloper have mentioned. Personally, I use vim for source editing, gcc and g++ for compiling and wrap all building process with makefiles - this works perfectly for me with SDL2 and OpenGL.

 

If you want to do cross-platform development, you could try CMake(which also works with QT Creator).

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Go with Code Blocks. It has templates ready to start up. You can go with SDL, Glut, Ogre.

Code Blocks has a lot of templates you can use. The downside is, it expects all external libraries

to be set up in the folder structure like this: glut /include /src.

Once you have this figured out, everything works as a charm.

 

Maybe you start with GCC and some simple GLUT programs, just to see how to compile.

Once you have that, you will easier assign the configuration for Code Blocks.

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Coming from the Windows world, I found Netbeans to be quite user friendly, and it have a lot of similarities with visual studio. Even if It's a Java IDE at first, the c/c++ support is really good, I didn't have any trouble making the debugger work either.

 

Netbeans also has a pretty powerful plugin system, so you can easily add feature later on. Here's an exemple on configuring SFML under linux, work pretty much the same way for other libraries : http://trevoke.net/blog/2009/03/08/howto-sfml-with-netbeans/

Edited by dlan

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Eclipse or QTCreator would be the best bet for IDE. 

 

What is X11? Do I need it?

 

It's a windowing protocol. You can use it if you want, although I'd recommend using something else that wraps the gnarly details (i.e. SDL, glfw, etc) [Life is too short to deal with X11 imho]. 

 

How do I install the latest drivers for this GPU? From what I can tell the latest don't support the X1300?

That largely depends on the driver, and/or flavour of linux. I've not use mint or ATI graphics on linux, so can't really offer advice here. My recommendation is to go troll a linux forum "Windows is so much better than linux, on windows I can install my x1300 drivers by double clicking the exe, under linux it's impossible to install the drivers!". You'll get 50 million responses with step by step instructions within 10 minutes.... 

 

So I am not liking the experience so far... Not trouble free at all....

Yeah, that's linux all over really. It gets easier with time, but with a lot of googling, trolling linux forums, and reading lots of man pages, you'll get there eventually. Just think of it as good training for the android NDK ;)

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code::blocks - great, some issues with autocompletion sometimes

codelite - pretty awesome, some plugins aren't free

vim+spf13 - very good historical fuzzy auto-complete + snippets main<ctrl+k> will give you a full int main(..). or class<ctrl+k>ClassName<ctrl+k> will fill out a simple class def and impl and a lot more

eclipse - awesome auto-complete lots of different languages

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A few tips that might help.

1) Like any new platform, start simple. Use a plain text editor and compile from the console until you understand what the IDEs are "meant" to be doing for you.

2) Are you new to C/C++ development too? If so, perhaps learn this on the platform you currently use so you are not in a completely foreign environment.

3) With Linux, in exactly the same way as OSX and Windows. If you have hardware that the OS does not support, swap out the hardware with something that does. In your case, a graphics card is quite an easy thing to replace. However, I would be suprised if your card was not supported. Perhaps try running glxgears or a 3D linux game (i.e OpenArena) to see if it is working.

What issues were you experiencing with Irrlicht? Did you install it from the package manager (# apt-get libirrlicht-dev) or manually from a source archive? If you specify the error you are having, I might be able to help solve it with you. In most cases you can compile code like:

$ g++ MyCode.cpp -lIrrlicht
Linux is trivial to develop for so once you get over these initial hurdles, you will find it extremely straightforward from then on. Edited by Karsten_

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