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gasto

\why can't I initialize a multidimensional C array with zeroes

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Why can't I simply initialize to zeroes a C multidimensional array as one would normally initialize a one dimensional array:

 

int arr[3]= {0}; / *yep.*/
int multArr[3][2] = {{0}}; /* nicht! */

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Technically this is the correct way:

 

int multArr[3][2] = { {0, 0}, {0, 0}, {0, 0} };

 

Doing as incertia suggests works too, but technically this is what happens:

 

1. The first value will be set to 0.

2. The values the are lacking will be set to 0.

 

Meaning that if you would initialise like this:

 

int multArr[3][2] = { 1 };

 

You would set the first value to 1, and the values that are lacking will be set to 0.

Edited by aregee

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int multArr[3][2] = { {0, 0}, {0, 0}, {0, 0} };

 

Yes. Aregee has it correct. On the other hand, you can allways use memset?

memset(multArr, 0, sizeof(multArr));

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Can anyone explain what the problem was with the original code? It works for me...

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The original poster has misunderstood the error output of his or her compile

You must be kidding me.

 

I know that one dimensional arrays initialize to 0 once at least one value is set, but I thought N dimensional array initialization had some quirks, like many things in C++.

Edited by gasto

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Meaning that if you would initialise like this:
 
int multArr[3][2] = { 1 };
 
You would set the first value to 1, and the values that are lacking will be set to 0.

 

Correct.  Just try it and ye shall see.  Though the OP explicitly asks why he can't...

 

 

simply initialize to zeroes a C multidimensional array as one would normally initialize a one dimensional array:

int arr[3]= {0}; / *yep.*/
int multArr[3][2] = {{0}}; /* nicht! */

 

Not sure what is not working for him as he has not mentioned what error he gets or how it is not working.

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