• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
ThinkingsHard

What path to take in programming?

10 posts in this topic

Hey guys,

 

     So, I'll get right into it. I just talked to my college adviser, and I can complete my degree next semester (Community College). We talked for a good while, and it would be a brutal semester but I could do it. Or I could take two more semesters, and take a few extra classes here or there, and get to know more of what I want to do. Let me bold this for anyone who skims  the biggest problem I'm having is that I do not know what niche in the programming world I want to fill. Do I want to be a game programmer? Maybe, it sounds like fun. Do I want to do mobile apps? Website? Back-end server? Data Analysis? Security? I don't know. And what I decide on, matters. If I decide of mobile apps, he suggested taking the extra semester, and taking a course with him in C# (The main language they teach in the college is Java, for 3 semesters, so that's the only language most of us know who come from there).

    So if anyone has suggestions, or brief layouts of the different niches in the programming world, that would help a lot. I know you might be hesitant to try to suggest anything, because you don't want to push someone into doing something. It's a decision they need to make on their own. I'm just looking for information here, the ups and downs of certain fields, so I can try to plan accordingly.

 

**Edit** It's early and I have to leave for work right now, but it seems I failed to mention that I DO plan on pursuing a Bachelors, and hopefully even a Masters degree in Computer Science. I'm just trying to decide if I should get my Associates a semester early, or take the extra semester, and an extra class or two, before going on to a four year school.**Edit**

 

     Thanks!

Edited by ThinkingsHard
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

By not knowing any Java myself, before deciding to extend any more time in school, I would pick up a book at the library or bookstore covering the recommended language to see if I could make the transition from 1 to the other on my own.  ( Chances are you probably could !!).   If I felt I could, then I would shorten my stay, finish my studies and pursue something with that obtained knowledge.  If I then find that I would want to continue my studies at a later date ( within a year or 2 ) then I could always return to school, even if only part time to pick up the extra knowledge.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


If you honestly don't know, I'd go to a library and get a book called "What Color is your Parachute?", and look up the chapters on the flower diagram. The exercise takes about a week if you intend to give it an honest effort, but the results are profoundly personal.

If you are using Windows you could download the free Kindle program and for $9.99 buy the book to read and do those chapters. If you are using Linux, get Chrome and install the Kindle Reader then buy the book. I got it so I could read through it just a few minutes ago.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


**Edit** It's early and I have to leave for work right now, but it seems I failed to mention that I DO plan on pursuing a Bachelors, and hopefully even a Masters degree in Computer Science. I'm just trying to decide if I should get my Associates a semester early, or take the extra semester, and an extra class or two, before going on to a four year school.**Edit**

 

If your community college is accredited (some are, some aren't) and the credits will transfer, stay in community college the extra semester and get as many 'basic' courses out of the way as you can. You'll be studying the same stuff at a four year school, but it will cost you a lot more for the same information.

 

If you plan on going forward in Computer Science - mathematics is going to be the most important things for you to study at the start. Once you cross the 'discrete mathematics' line and move into areas which are much more about 'proofs' than they are about computation you'll really push your logical knowledge. Topology is an obvious one, but there are others as well. Higher computational math will help you as well, particularly if you want to go into 3D game design. Differential Geometry, for example, is what's used to map a skin to a mesh.

 

For the computer programming part: learn to code. It doesn't matter whether you're designing a game, a spreadsheet app, the back end for a database client, or a OS Kernel - algorithms are universal. Read as many of the 'classic' texts as you can get your hands on (Knuth, Gang of Four, etc...), and code as much as you can.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take the extra semester, but no more courses than you have to. Use your increased free time to dig into game programming on your own. A community college won't be able to teach you near as much about what you're after as hands-on experience making a game.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take the extra semester, but no more courses than you have to. Use your increased free time to dig into game programming on your own. A community college won't be able to teach you near as much about what you're after as hands-on experience making a game.

 

But a community college can teach him history, and a foreign language, and a lot of other courses that he'll have to take at some point to get a degree. If the course credits transfer, it's much better to take them at community college prices than wait until you're in a big name university and pay their tuition fees for the same courses.

Edited by Mouser9169
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0