• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Tutorial Doctor

The Subscription Model needs to be adjusted.

61 posts in this topic

Oh definately. Can't forget that good ol' kickstarter! It's almost a no brainier to go that route, at least for now.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't read Atlas Shrugged. Its cool as a story but sadly its jam packed with Manifesto. Its like HPMOR but even more obnoxious.


The 'manifesto' is why I recommended it :cool:

Ayn Rand was a very vocal proponent of capitalism, and the book is very relevant to the question of FOSS software development.
Ayn Rand was a fucking moron. Her understanding of society and economics rivals that of a particularly slow toddler.

And by all means, read her nonsense. It's like the bible; it's only when you actually read that you can recognise how truly awful it is.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Don't read Atlas Shrugged. Its cool as a story but sadly its jam packed with Manifesto. Its like HPMOR but even more obnoxious.


The 'manifesto' is why I recommended it cool.png

Ayn Rand was a very vocal proponent of capitalism, and the book is very relevant to the question of FOSS software development.
Ayn Rand was a fucking moron. Her understanding of society and economics rivals that of a particularly slow toddler.

And by all means, read her nonsense. It's like the bible; it's only when you actually read that you can recognise how truly awful it is.

 

I can recognize how awful it is without reading it. I don't have to shoot myself to know I don't like that, same goes for bible.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Ayn Rand was a fucking moron. Her understanding of society and economics rivals that of a particularly slow toddler.

 

You could easily say the same thing about Richard M. Stallman, but many people in the FOSS community seem to dig what he says.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


Ayn Rand was a fucking moron. Her understanding of society and economics rivals that of a particularly slow toddler.

 

You could easily say the same thing about Richard M. Stallman, but many people in the FOSS community seem to dig what he says.

 

Yeah, you haven't done enough research on Rand if you compare them.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 


Ayn Rand was a fucking moron. Her understanding of society and economics rivals that of a particularly slow toddler.

 

You could easily say the same thing about Richard M. Stallman, but many people in the FOSS community seem to dig what he says.

 

Yeah, you haven't done enough research on Rand if you compare them.

 

 

I'll admit, RMS is probably a bit further "out there" than Rand is.

 

Both of them espouse(d) ideals that don't really work well in the real world. Both of them oppose(d) a contrary ideal they saw as a growing threat to freedom. One of them peels things off his foot to eat on stage when he gets hungry. Of the two, I think Rand's ideal is worth striving for much more than RMS's. Especially as a game designer, btw: MMO economies tend to be VERY Randian.

 

People who create things should be fairly compensated for them. I've known more than a few people I believe are legitimately worth more than a million dollars a year (I've also met people earning that much who... well let's just say were worth somewhat less, IMHO).

 

Part of the problem for RMS may be due to him locking himself away in an ivory tower of academia never using "non-free" software, which means he has no idea what most of the software written these days does, who it is written for, or how it works. Rand's problem was similar, though from a different cause, seeing the extremes growing in the Warsaw Pact nations and what they were doing to the people there.

 

Even Alan Greenspan [whether you agreed with his particular brand of economics or not, _no one_ understood the American economy the way he did] erred on the side of "humanity" believing that corporations would hold themselves to at least some standard of ethics - this oversight contributed (not caused) to one of the latest banking/wall street bailouts (there have been so many I've lost track).

 

Sometimes you need to see, study, and understand the extremes so you can find the right balance in the middle.

Much of life follows that pattern.

Edited by Mouser9169
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I mean Rand is way more out there than Stallman. Not only will corporations not limit their excesses but individual followers of Rand have shown what will happen if more people subscribe to her ideology.

 

The problem with fair compensation is that there is no such thing. Especially in the arts, the creative careers, politics and so forth. And perhaps most of all in finance and capital based industries. Which includes executives and what not.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To AltarOfScience. I just have to say that if anything, the theme of the Bible is insight into just how aweful humanity is, rather than how awful God is for judging humanity for their awfulness. The state of the world today is evidence.

But on topic, end of topic. hehe.
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To AltarOfScience. I just have to say that if anything, the theme of the Bible is insight into just how aweful humanity is, rather than how awful God is for judging humanity for their awfulness. The state of the world today is evidence.

But on topic, end of topic. hehe.

Humanity is also aweful at spelling. Well, awful at spelling.

 

As for the bible, your comment has nothing to do with the original bible related comment.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, I mean Rand is way more out there than Stallman. Not only will corporations not limit their excesses but individual followers of Rand have shown what will happen if more people subscribe to her ideology.

 

The problem with fair compensation is that there is no such thing. Especially in the arts, the creative careers, politics and so forth. And perhaps most of all in finance and capital based industries. Which includes executives and what not.

 

I knew what you meant. I just disagree with you.

 

You mention art - the best place to see the value of art is at an auction. Nothing sold at auction ever sells for more than it is worth. Executives work for their money. If there were people who could do as good a job as they do and were willing to do it for less money, the market would snatch those people up in a heartbeat.

 

As for RMS, he doesn't believe that creating software is something that should be compensated at all, hence the GPL and the 'Free' software philosophy that goes along with it. He's quick to give an example that he can't 'help' his neighbor with proprietary software, while the reality (at least until recently) was that he legally could. He just had to uninstall the software from his machine and let his neighbor install it on his. When his neighbor is done with it, reverse the process (similar to lending your neighbor your lawnmower - you can't mow your own lawn until you get the mower back). Of course he ignores how his model actively hurts the developer (somebody's neighbor) trying to make a living selling software, as well.

 

He's also very actively anti-proprietary software: He wants to hurt proprietary developers as much as he can (again, hence the 'viral' nature of the GPL and his calls for people to stop using the LGPL for libraries). It isn't enough for Free software to be an option - all software should conform to his ideals.

 

I could go on and on but to cut it short: the man is a communist at heart who lost touch with the 'real world' decades ago.

That's not to say he hasn't done good things, but he represents one 'extreme' of the software development spectrum.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for anyone who does not know yet, this is a critical letter from Bill Gates before software was a subject to copyright and was "free to edit/use" comodity in coding community of that decade (the letter also shows reduced rethorical skills of Bill )

 

http://www.blinkenlights.com/classiccmp/gateswhine.html

 

I understand we need to make a living, but there is no need to be too dogmatic about it and hate moding comunities apriori or such stuff

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0