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rAm_y_

What upcoming technologies are there?

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Both software and hardware, for example Oculus and the Mantle API, both have been released to devs but obvioulsy not generally. What other technologies are coming up. For example, there is OLED screens, AR, DirectX 12, Parallella, Leap Motion, Firefox OS.

 

Anything else you can add?

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AMD are actually moving into the audio processing space, now that audio cards aren't really a thing any more, and they're looking for any edge they can get in the GPU market.
These new devices are insanely more powerful than DSP's of the past, allowing true audio spatialization at runtime (instead of tr usual reverb/etc effects of the past, such as EAX). For example, like how we can use HDR cube maps to light a scene realistically (IBL), we can now fire a gunshot in a room, record and process the response (IR), and hen use that to convolve the game sounds that are in that room, to near perfectly recreate the sound of a real space.
These kinds of convolutions aren't widespread yet, but they're in use as part of the secret sauce in a few current games that have been praised for their audio quality ;)
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Here is a new battery tech that can charge in 30 seconds: click.

This combined with wireless charging will make the phone experience much better.

 

I can also imagine using similar technology in electric cars will make it possible to have re-charge stations along the highway.

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Here is a new battery tech that can charge in 30 seconds: click.

This combined with wireless charging will make the phone experience much better.

 

I can also imagine using similar technology in electric cars will make it possible to have re-charge stations along the highway.

I don't see the advantage of wireless charging as it still needs to be so close that you could just as well plug it in.

 

There was something in the news some time ago about cars being recharged using technology inside the road, but I don't know how it works.

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Last week I was reading about transcranial ultrasonic brain stimulation, something which actually has been tested on humans.  As you may know, the downside of transcranial electrical stimulation methods are that they frequently require a saline solution and some people experience skin discomfort, plus the FDA hasn't yet approved it for consumer use.  The largest limitation of this tech is that we don't yet fully understand the effects of ultrasound on the brain.  Fortunately, no negative side effects have been seen yet.  (This form of ultrasound is around 6 Mhz, which is far below what they use for welding.)  The US military is already trying it out for mind control of soldiers, supposedly.  As best as I can tell, it can affect the motor and visual cortices.  Wouldn't it be just jolly if Dollhouse could really happen?

 

You guys might remember years ago hearing about another mind-control technology that relied on sending electrical pulses through the inner ear to manipulate a person's balance.  In video linked, the tech was used to control a person's walking.  What I did not realize was that this same mechanism can apparently be used to give the sensation of G-forces.  Imagine pairing that with Oculus or Project Morpheus.

 

The OP mentioned OLED.  There's a potential successor to that called OLET (as opposed to diodes, it's transistors).  You can see demos of them on YouTube, but it doesn't appear that anyone's made a display of them yet.  It seems that displays using this tech would be the thinnest, should they were ever to be realized.  Maybe we'll finally get displays that can cut our hands biggrin.png .

 

Judging by reviews, Leap Motion isn't doing so well in the market.  That tech uses infrared.  There's another company, called Elliptic Labs, that uses ultrasound.  We really do need an affordable, well-supported, hands-free gesture solution.

 

One tech I'm disappointed by is ReRAM (a.k.a. memristors).  I'm disappointed because the commercialization date has been set back.  They were originally scheduled for 2013, but I couldn't tell what what the current date is.  My body is ready to see a demo.  Aside from that, though, I am thoroughly impressed.  They currently are 1/9 the speed of DDR3, but they are still much faster than flash.  The capacity suggests that multiple terabytes could fit on a thumbdrive--which isn't that much of a stretch, considering we already have terabyte flash thumbdrives.

 

EDIT: Fixed a typo.

Edited by shuma-gorath
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Last week I was reading about transcranial ultrasonic brain stimulation, something which actually has been tested on humans.  As you may know, the downside of transcranial electrical stimulation methods are that they frequently require a saline solution and some people experience skin discomfort, plus the FDA hasn't yet approved it for consumer use.  The largest limitation of this tech is that we don't yet fully understand the effects of ultrasound on the brain.  Fortunately, no negative side effects have been seen yet.  (This form of ultrasound is around 6 Mhz, which is far below what they use for welding.)  The US military is already trying it out for mind control of soldiers, supposedly.  As best as I can tell, it can affect the motor and visual cortices.  Wouldn't it be just jolly if Dollhouse could really happen?

 

You guys might remember years ago hearing about another mind-control technology that relied on sending electrical pulses through the inner ear to manipulate a person's balance.  In video linked, the tech was used to control a person's walking.  What I did not realize was that this same mechanism can apparently be used to give the sensation of G-forces.  Imagine pairing that with Oculus or Project Morpheus.

 

The OP mentioned OLED.  There's a potential successor to that called OLET (as opposed to diodes, it's transistors).  You can see demos of them on YouTube, but it doesn't appear that anyone's made a display of them yet.  It seems that displays using this tech would be the thinnest, should they were ever to be realized.  Maybe we'll finally get displays that can but our hands biggrin.png .

 

Judging by reviews, Leap Motion isn't doing so well in the market.  That tech uses infrared.  There's another company, called Elliptic Labs, that uses ultrasound.  We really do need an affordable, well-supported, hands-free gesture solution.

 

One tech I'm disappointed by is ReRAM (a.k.a. memristors).  I'm disappointed because the commercialization date has been set back.  They were originally scheduled for 2013, but I couldn't tell what what the current date is.  My body is ready to see a demo.  Aside from that, though, I am thoroughly impressed.  They currently are 1/9 the speed of DDR3, but they are still much faster than flash.  The capacity suggests that multiple terabytes could fit on a thumbdrive--which isn't that much of a stretch, considering we already have terabyte flash thumbdrives.

Really, there are TB flashdrives, I have never read of any?

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Yeah, I was a bit surprised myself. I knew they already had SSDs (not thumbdrives) that were close to 1 TB, but, out of curiosity, I searched Amazon and found actual 1 TB thumbdrives. I've got to say, the tech moves fast. Edited by shuma-gorath
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Re-posting this here because it's relevant.

 

The memristor enables a new, far more compact form of storage space. HP talks of 100TB memristor drives by 2018, and even claims memristors could replace DRAM and other conventional memory topologies.

 

From Wikipedia, it is claimed that memristors can theoretically be used to store 1 petabit (1024 terabits) of information in an area of just 1 cm^3.

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