• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
vinnyvicious

Good step-by-step development tutorials/books

30 posts in this topic

Thanks for mentioning those two books, they are great and i heavily recommend them. I would, however, recommend reading the SDL one first, so you can understand the abstractions mentioned in the SFML one better.

 

 completely forgot about them! Looking for more tutorials/books though. :D

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Unfortunately, that Reconstructing Cave Story series is probably the most detailed tutorial you'll find for step-by-step game creation. Although much more simplistic, you may want to check out the Snake tutorial on this website if you haven't already.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't talking about their OpenGL tutorials.  I was talking about their beginners C++ tutorials in which they make a complete game from scratch.  These may be a little dated but as a tutorial for somebody who wants to make a complete game step by step they are a good start. 

 

From your original post I thought the onus was in tutorials that provided complete step by step tutorials on making a game.

Edited by Buster2000
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are not sticking to c++ then Game Maker is a good tool for beginners and there are lots of books availble too.

-2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to agree that, sadly, there are not very many things that go in detailed steps like the Cave Story link. I also agree with the Games from Scratch link and the SFML Game Development/SDL Game Development books being great resources. I own both books, as I love to buy books just so I can read them and recommend them if I like them.


If you are not sticking to c++ then Game Maker is a good tool for beginners and there are lots of books availble too

No one said they were giving up on C++. If someone gave up on C++ due to its complexity, I wouldn't recommend Game Maker until the last resort, but rather C#, Java, Python as an alternative language to try and learn instead or Unity. Then ultimately Game Maker, but again I don't recall reading anyone saying they were leaving C++.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The thing is, i'm not looking for a complex program. Step-by-step tutorials are great for knowing the small design decisions and challenges that you are faced when creating a project from scratch. The SDL and SFML books mentioned in this topic are great examples of that. The games are very similar, but the authors have very different approaches to similar decisions. This, in my opinion, is precious when creating a project of your own. Being able to see the problems in different perspectives is priceless.

 

To sum up, i'm not looking for something that does the job for me, but something that gives me a different perspective, a different way to tackle common problems in game development. Step-by-step tutorials are great for this, specially if we focus on C/C++ tutorials. Having that said, i wish we could share more links and book names instead of discussing the morality of the topic.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

http://codingmadeeasy.ca/tutorialLayout/cpp for c++

and

http://codingmadeeasy.ca/tutorialLayout/sfml2 for c++/SFML 2.0.

 

are both pretty step by step and rather easy to follow. He walks you through the game creation from beginning to (mostly) the end. He does a fairly good job of explaining what he's doing and why, and how it ties into the rest of the program. I found that pretty essential and extremely helpful when I watched them.

Edited by Misantes
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The issue I have with step-by-step tutorials is that they don't usually promote the programmer taking time to understand it, but rather encourages them to take shortcuts and simply copy and paste the code to get the game done. This leaves them running into the same issue until they stop and try to figure it out themselves or get guidance from another programmer who won't give them the answer right off. That is just my personal opinion on them though.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do have advantages:

  • They give beginners a good notion of all the required expertise when implementing a specific game
  • They give a good insight on different ways of tackling different problems (different devs, different approaches to game dev)
  • They give a good notion of what's required to implement a speicifc game design
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The issue I have with step-by-step tutorials is that they don't usually promote the programmer taking time to understand it, but rather encourages them to take shortcuts and simply copy and paste the code to get the game done. This leaves them running into the same issue until they stop and try to figure it out themselves or get guidance from another programmer who won't give them the answer right off. That is just my personal opinion on them though.

 

This is the exact problem I'm running into. I'm to a point where I can recognize someone's patterns, but they're still mum as to methodology.

 

I've been really hurting for guides that stop and explain the programming equivalents of "hey, if you're microwaving food, arrange it around the edges of the plate so it heats more evenly," or "yeah, you could drive that screw into the wall with a hammer, OR you could use a screwdriver because it works WITH the screw."

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

They do have advantages:

  • They give beginners a good notion of all the required expertise when implementing a specific game
  • They give a good insight on different ways of tackling different problems (different devs, different approaches to game dev)
  • They give a good notion of what's required to implement a speicifc game design

 

The only ones that get that advantage are the ones who actually bother understanding the code in the tutorials. Unfortunately, the number of 'beginners' who are impatient and want to go from 0 to 60 now is steadily increasing. 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So, the fault lies in part of the audience, not the author of the tutorial or the intended audience. This is a whole different discussion, and has nothing to do with people who enjoy reading tutorials with a specific purpose. Take the SFML book mentioned in this thread: not only the author gives a great insight into all the required expertise for creating a whole game, inspiring the reader to go the extra mile after reading the book, but it also gives great C++11 tips and game design tips. It's a wonderful book, impossible to get bored while reading. Now, how many programming/game dev books you slept while reading? 

 

There is different content for different people. And some enjoy working on full projects, with clear objectives, and have a helping hand going through it all.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They do have advantages:

  • They give beginners a good notion of all the required expertise when implementing a specific game
  • They give a good insight on different ways of tackling different problems (different devs, different approaches to game dev)
  • They give a good notion of what's required to implement a speicifc game design
The only ones that get that advantage are the ones who actually bother understanding the code in the tutorials. Unfortunately, the number of 'beginners' who are impatient and want to go from 0 to 60 now is steadily increasing.

Then that is a totally different argument and nothing to do with the actual content that he original poster is asking for. While I do agree with you, you will only get out of those tutorials by how much effort you put in. Though if you actually put in the the time and effort, like it seems the orginal poster wants to do, then those tutorials can be of great benefit.

I just think it's wrong to say those tutorials/content is bad for a programmer then blame it soley on the users of the content that doesn't put the time and effort in.
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0