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KaiserJohan

OpenGL Shadowsampler comparison

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Doing cascaded shadow mapping, and I need some confirmation I am doing the right thing. The shadow mapping works (mostly) but on a few angles the shadows vanish.

 

The sampler is setup like this:

 

GLCALL(glGenSamplers(1, &mTextureSampler));
GLCALL(glSamplerParameteri(mTextureSampler, GL_TEXTURE_COMPARE_MODE, GL_COMPARE_REF_TO_TEXTURE));
GLCALL(glSamplerParameteri(mTextureSampler, GL_TEXTURE_MAG_FILTER, GL_LINEAR));
GLCALL(glSamplerParameteri(mTextureSampler, GL_TEXTURE_MIN_FILTER, GL_LINEAR));
GLCALL(glSamplerParameteri(mTextureSampler, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_S, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE));
GLCALL(glSamplerParameteri(mTextureSampler, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_T, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE));
GLCALL(glSamplerParameteri(mTextureSampler, GL_TEXTURE_WRAP_R, GL_CLAMP_TO_EDGE));
GLCALL(glBindSampler(OpenGLTexture::TEXTURE_UNIT_SHADOW_DIRECTIONAL, mTextureSampler));

I do depth comparison rather than distance comparison; my depth textures thus contain depth values.

 

vec4 projCoords = UnifDirLightPass.mVPMatrix[index] * vec4(worldPos, 1.0);                                                  
projCoords.w    = projCoords.z - DEPTH_BIAS;                                                                                
projCoords.z    = float(index);                                                                                             
float visibilty = texture(unifShadowTexture, projCoords);                                                                   


float angleNormal = clamp(dot(normal, UnifDirLightPass.mLightDir.xyz), 0, 1);                                               


fragColor = vec4(diffuse, 1.0) * visibilty * angleNormal * UnifDirLightPass.mLightColor;                                    

"unifShadowTexture" is of type "sampler2DarrayShadow", and "UnifDirLightPass.mVPMatrix[]" contains the bias * lightProj * lightView matrix for each split.

 

 

1. By having MIN/MAG filtering to GL_LINEAR, shouldn't I also have visibility = 0.5 for some samples? All I see is either 0.0 or 1.0.

 

2. Is the comparison in texture() valid? I believe I read somewhere that depth values aren't stored linearly, does this create a problem when I try to compare it against bias * lightProj * lightView * worldPosition?

 

3. For what reason would you use distance comparison (= writing the squared distance to the depth texture) over depth comparison for shadow mapping? It just seems like extra computations?

 

4. I am using shadow samplers, which gives me 0.0 or 1.0 values. How can I accomplish soft shadows with this for directional and point lights with such binary values to work with?

 

5. Why would you not use shadow samplers over normal samplers in shadow mapping?

 

Thanks

Edited by KaiserJohan

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1. By having MIN/MAG filtering to GL_LINEAR, shouldn't I also have visibility = 0.5 for some samples? All I see is either 0.0 or 1.0.

The result of the texture sampler (you have a shadow sampler which do a depth comparision) is either in shadow or not in shadow (use PCF or other fitlerings to get soft shadows). The linear filtering is used to get the right depth comparision value, but the final result is only the binary result of the comparision of the filtered depth value and your reference value.

 

 

 


4. I am using shadow samplers, which gives me 0.0 or 1.0 values. How can I accomplish soft shadows with this for directional and point lights with such binary values to work with?

To create soft  shadows , you can't use standard texture filtering methods (eg linear filtering), they will not really work. An often used approach is, to sample multiple shadow samples and calculate the shadow values yourself (eg PCF), I use ie 12-24 samples per rendered pixel to soften my shadows in my engine. Look out for hardware supported filtering too (again PCF).

 

 

5. Why would you not use shadow samplers over normal samplers in shadow mapping?

Because the hardware might be optimize to do the comparision of the shadow values, and the hardware could support already some degree of PCF to soften your shadows. In comes all down to better out-of-the-box hardware support.

Edited by Ashaman73

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1. By having MIN/MAG filtering to GL_LINEAR, shouldn't I also have visibility = 0.5 for some samples? All I see is either 0.0 or 1.0.

The result of the texture sampler (you have a shadow sampler which do a depth comparision) is either in shadow or not in shadow (use PCF or other fitlerings to get soft shadows). The linear filtering is used to get the right depth comparision value, but the final result is only the binary result of the comparision of the filtered depth value and your reference value.

I'm not sure about in GL, but this is actually how you enable hardware-accelerated PCF in D3D. The comparison happens first, on 4 unfiltered depth values, and then those 0/1 comparison results are linearly filtered.

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Is there no way to increase the samples used for hardware-accelerated PCF? It still looks very blocky with GL_LINEAR for OpenGL. Doing 12 samples software-style, does that mean 12 texture lookups? sounds expensive?

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Yep. Probably good to have a few different shaders for low-end vs high-end GPUs.
But, 12 HW-PCF samples is actually 48 texels worth of data, so it's pretty good value ;)

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Doing 12 samples software-style, does that mean 12 texture lookups?

You can use branching to your benefit. First make a quick test with 4 lookups, if all are either inside or outside of the shadow, you can mark the pixel as shadowed/unshadowed. If you got a mixed result, just look up X more shadow texels. The benefit comes from how GPUs work (atleast some, depends on hardware). GPU often group the processing units into wavefronts, cells whatever, which process multiple input data as single process (they do the same work at the same time). This is a reason, that branching hurts sometimes, because if some units of this group needs to do something else, the rest of the group need to wait and the total amount of processing time of the whole group increases.

 

Nevertheless, in our case, we want to optimize from, lets say 20 texel to just 4 texel access (sometimes). That is, if just one unit of a wavefront hits a mixed shadowed result, all pixels need the same (worst case) time. But if all unit just need 4 texel accesses, you suddently save a lot of processing time for this wavefront. A pixel wavefront eg has a 8x8 block size, thought this really depends on the hardware architecture. And the probabilty, that a 8x8 block is completly inside or outside the shadow , is quite high. Instead of lets say 20 texel access for the worst case scenario, you suddenly have an average case of ~12 texel access (assumption 50% hit rate => 4 + 16*50%).

 

The benefit:

If you work on a console, you should have access to detailed GPU archtecture information and can utilize it accordingly. If you work on the PC with unknown hardware, just build in an option which let you choose your shadow smoothness (from 1 sample up to 48 samples) and the user is able to decide himself which is best (performance vs quality).

Edited by Ashaman73

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