• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Unduli

Company Name problem

9 posts in this topic

Hello there,

 

  Started topic seeing some are moved here, sorry if wrong place.

 

  As title suggests, looking for a name for my upcomining game company. I know usually it is name first then logo but this time there are already logos I created years ago, so don't want to lose time with this atm.

 

  I will be pleased if I could hear some advice for name suiting to any of logos (would love to hear "why" as well)

 

 So here are logos,

 

OUkz2BD.png

Colors are not painted on stone, subject to change ofc

 

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Unduli
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What sort of game(s) are you (planning on) making?  Is there any specific genre or theme you will likely be specialising in?  Anything noteworthy or unusual about your design philosophy?  Are there any goals or qualities you want your name to convey?

 

In general a good company name should be a) memorable, b) reasonably easy/intuitive to spell (so people don't mistype it when searching or browsing to your website), and c) hopefully different enough from any competitors or any unrelated businesses you might not want to be confused with.

 

 

Beyond those qualities the specifics of your company name really aren't all that important.  Successful businesses sometimes have longer names (Blizzard Entertainment) and sometimes have short names (iD, Crytek), sometimes have serious names (Square, Rare) and sometimes have funny or playful names (Epic MegaGames, Naughty Dog), sometimes use existing words (Rare), and sometimes use made up words (Positech).

 

 

The top logo could possibly go with the name "Paper Animal", or the third down with "Racing Snail", both of which I think are reasonably memorable and pretty easy to spell if they aren't already in use, but other than that no specific suggestions leap to mind based on your logo images.  Hope that advice is helpful though! smile.png

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What sort of game(s) are you (planning on) making?  Is there any specific genre or theme you will likely be specialising in?  Anything noteworthy or unusual about your design philosophy?  Are there any goals or qualities you want your name to convey?

 

[...]

 

First, thanks for caring to reply

 

I have natural leaning for strategy games but like most examples (Firaxis, Maxis, EA ...), don't believe name has to include clues.

 

And agree that name is not too important as long as it doesn't give wrong message.

 

Actually I had names for all of logos ( TriGoat (TreeGoat) , Kleice (name of gf's dog smile.png , but here have Klei Entertainment ) , SnailFast, CowBright and Giraffene ) but they sounded stupid though once sounded brilliant. Actually what sounded stupid to me is using Cow in name because theres a cow smile.png too obvious imo

 

Maybe I overengineer, why not pick any ? smile.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a native English speaker who only has a passing familiarity with other languages I find "Kleice" difficult to pronounce and unintuitive to remember or spell; if your target market includes others of the same background it might make a poor choice; if you're happy to restrict your target market to people more familiar with whichever language it's sourced from it may be a fine choice.

 

The other suggestions all pass the memorable and easy-to-spell tests and would probably be fine if you're happy with them.

 

The "Giraffene" and "Cowbright" logos don't really look like a giraffe or a cow to me.  I can make it out now that it's been pointed out, but I never would have thought of them myself otherwise.

 

 

I don't have any strong feelings either way about them otherwise. smile.png

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As a native English speaker who only has a passing familiarity with other languages I find "Kleice" difficult to pronounce and unintuitive to remember or spell; if your target market includes others of the same background it might make a poor choice; if you're happy to restrict your target market to people more familiar with whichever language it's sourced from it may be a fine choice.

 

The other suggestions all pass the memorable and easy-to-spell tests and would probably be fine if you're happy with them.

 

The "Giraffene" and "Cowbright" logos don't really look like a giraffe or a cow to me.  I can make it out now that it's been pointed out, but I never would have thought of them myself otherwise.

 

 

I don't have any strong feelings either way about them otherwise. smile.png

 

Actually perfect anglicization would be "Kleiche" but considering Škoda (Shkoda) doesn't bother being called as Skoda, still not sure if it is primary concern.

 

Btw, just learnt that "Snail Fast" makes no sense as what I actually meant was "Snails Pace" :)

 

And Cowbright (no offence) reminds me Madeleine Albright nowadays :) , Giraffene (like Graphene) sounds nerd so dunno :)

 

So seems will look for new alternatives.

 

Thanks though

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good name can't guarantee success, but a bad one can certainly lead you to failure. (I can't see your logos, so can't comment on those).

 

It's worth putting a lot of thought into: hopefully that name will be representing you and your work for a long time. As was pointed out above, easy pronunciation and spelling are very important. Blizzard may not immediately conjure up images of video games to someone hearing of the company for the first time, but at least they know how to say it and how to spell it. It's also easy to remember.

 

Names of gaming companies/publishers that I can think of off the top of my head: Blizzard, Bioware, Square(Soft -Enix), Black Isle Studios, Elephant, ERS, BoomZap, Blue Tea Games. I also have names like Obsidian branded into my head for all the wrong reasons (rushing out two unfinished sequel games).

 

The one thing they all have in common: if I read the name out loud to someone fairly fluent in English, they can write it down spelled correctly. In this age where people expect to be able to type www.<company name>.com and get to your website, that is VERY important.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A good name can't guarantee success, but a bad one can certainly lead you to failure. (I can't see your logos, so can't comment on those).

 

It's worth putting a lot of thought into: hopefully that name will be representing you and your work for a long time. As was pointed out above, easy pronunciation and spelling are very important. Blizzard may not immediately conjure up images of video games to someone hearing of the company for the first time, but at least they know how to say it and how to spell it. It's also easy to remember.

 

Names of gaming companies/publishers that I can think of off the top of my head: Blizzard, Bioware, Square(Soft -Enix), Black Isle Studios, Elephant, ERS, BoomZap, Blue Tea Games. I also have names like Obsidian branded into my head for all the wrong reasons (rushing out two unfinished sequel games).

 

The one thing they all have in common: if I read the name out loud to someone fairly fluent in English, they can write it down spelled correctly. In this age where people expect to be able to type www.<company name>.com and get to your website, that is VERY important.

 

I share your concerns about game name (it would be a disaster to have a name like Rybczynski) but as long as not ultra cryptic , doubt company name matters that much. But I am ok with name being highly English-compliant.

 

This is partly because I believe this is not www.companyname.com era but google "www.companyname.com" era.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's might be wise to incorporate as something mundane then use a trading name as the one people see.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's might be wise to incorporate as something mundane then use a trading name as the one people see.

 

May have a branding strategy but in this case I am looking for a brand name :)

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why not try a web company name generator, they usually have real people enter names. Good thing is that those people are US and or Commonwealth based so you dont have to worry about "how does it sound in english".

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0