• Advertisement
Sign in to follow this  

Designing visual style for a game

This topic is 1367 days old which is more than the 365 day threshold we allow for new replies. Please post a new topic.

If you intended to correct an error in the post then please contact us.

Recommended Posts

Hello!
I have done programming my game and now it is time for artwork. And what I want is to create my own style of graphics and than fit all my models and interface elements into that style. Like when you look at any World of Warcraft screenshot and you already can tell the game it is from only looking at one or two objects.
But I have no idea how to achieve this. I googled and couldn't find anything. If somebody could provide me with some links or keywords to google for it would be awesome.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Advertisement

Well, all the individual art styles of games or animation fit into one of the major families of art styles.  So you could start by identifying which type of art style you want.  Also, most projects have their art style set by an individual artist, who has probably evolved their unique style over years.  If you are an artist, I can only assume that you already have some kind of personal style; if you aren't, then you aren't really in a position to do more than verbally describe the style you want and maybe collect some reference images to illustrate what you want to the artist you hire or recruit.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


if you aren't, then you aren't really in a position to do more than verbally describe the style you want and maybe collect some reference images to illustrate what you want to the artist you hire or recruit.

 

or the artist you become as you learn to do it yourself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


if you aren't, then you aren't really in a position to do more than verbally describe the style you want and maybe collect some reference images to illustrate what you want to the artist you hire or recruit.

 

or the artist you become as you learn to do it yourself.

 

That's true - an artist who hasn't yet developed a personal style is kind of a borderline case, and requires a different approach.  For that I'd recommend a survey of art history course, or self-study of the same material.  Going to the nearest public library or used book store which has a section of photo-books of different historical kinds of art would be a good start.  Reading an illustrated history of art book might help, though those tend to skim over many of the really interesting periods, like prehistoric art around the world, and often the book is too old to have any information on the art of the last 20 years.  If you know you want some kind of cartoony style, looking through a bookstore's graphic novel section is also a good idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is really such a broad question.

It's pretty much up to the art director to set the visual style for your game.

I would start by asking where you want to be on the line from highly stylized or gritty realism.

 

highly stylized - Journey, Limbo, Wow, Borderlands, Bethesda games, Most modern day shooters - Gritty Realism

 

but even with in this spectrum you can have varying design, colour palettes, art styles.

 

think of your budget and what you or your artist's own preferences are and off course what you think is visually pleasing. You would be the one looking at your game more then others.

 

hope it helps

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The creative director should start by describing the setting, mood, tone, themes, etc, etc, giving a good written idea of what it's all about. They and/or the art director would then collect a bunch of references from other games, photography, art, etc which fits the mood. They'd then work with concept artists to do some quick paintings / studies to get a feel for what the creative vision could look like. These quick paintings would then be completed, based on feedback from the creative/art directors. A whole lot more concept art is then produced, based off what's been created in this phase so far, depicting all the major areas/items/characters that the production team will need to create. The environment/prop/character/effects artists and the graphics programmers then get stuck into trying to reproduce the feel of the concepts in the game engine happy.png

Often, screenshots of work-in-progress content from the game engine will be given back to the concept artists, who'll do "paint overs" -- using the screenshot as a base, and painting over it what they feel the final product should look like. The production team can then use this as a guide to continue working towards that goal.

Throughout all of this, a single art-director is supervising everyone, acting as the critic who can accept or reject work, giving feedback on how to make sure that everything fits into the one vision.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  

  • Advertisement