• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
regnar

Designing visual style for a game

6 posts in this topic

Hello!
I have done programming my game and now it is time for artwork. And what I want is to create my own style of graphics and than fit all my models and interface elements into that style. Like when you look at any World of Warcraft screenshot and you already can tell the game it is from only looking at one or two objects.
But I have no idea how to achieve this. I googled and couldn't find anything. If somebody could provide me with some links or keywords to google for it would be awesome.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


if you aren't, then you aren't really in a position to do more than verbally describe the style you want and maybe collect some reference images to illustrate what you want to the artist you hire or recruit.

 

or the artist you become as you learn to do it yourself.

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 


if you aren't, then you aren't really in a position to do more than verbally describe the style you want and maybe collect some reference images to illustrate what you want to the artist you hire or recruit.

 

or the artist you become as you learn to do it yourself.

 

That's true - an artist who hasn't yet developed a personal style is kind of a borderline case, and requires a different approach.  For that I'd recommend a survey of art history course, or self-study of the same material.  Going to the nearest public library or used book store which has a section of photo-books of different historical kinds of art would be a good start.  Reading an illustrated history of art book might help, though those tend to skim over many of the really interesting periods, like prehistoric art around the world, and often the book is too old to have any information on the art of the last 20 years.  If you know you want some kind of cartoony style, looking through a bookstore's graphic novel section is also a good idea.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

this is really such a broad question.

It's pretty much up to the art director to set the visual style for your game.

I would start by asking where you want to be on the line from highly stylized or gritty realism.

 

highly stylized - Journey, Limbo, Wow, Borderlands, Bethesda games, Most modern day shooters - Gritty Realism

 

but even with in this spectrum you can have varying design, colour palettes, art styles.

 

think of your budget and what you or your artist's own preferences are and off course what you think is visually pleasing. You would be the one looking at your game more then others.

 

hope it helps

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The creative director should start by describing the setting, mood, tone, themes, etc, etc, giving a good written idea of what it's all about. They and/or the art director would then collect a bunch of references from other games, photography, art, etc which fits the mood. They'd then work with concept artists to do some quick paintings / studies to get a feel for what the creative vision could look like. These quick paintings would then be completed, based on feedback from the creative/art directors. A whole lot more concept art is then produced, based off what's been created in this phase so far, depicting all the major areas/items/characters that the production team will need to create. The environment/prop/character/effects artists and the graphics programmers then get stuck into trying to reproduce the feel of the concepts in the game engine happy.png

Often, screenshots of work-in-progress content from the game engine will be given back to the concept artists, who'll do "paint overs" -- using the screenshot as a base, and painting over it what they feel the final product should look like. The production team can then use this as a guide to continue working towards that goal.

Throughout all of this, a single art-director is supervising everyone, acting as the critic who can accept or reject work, giving feedback on how to make sure that everything fits into the one vision.

2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0