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CriticallyPixel

Feedback needed for Rouge-Like 2D Platformer Sci-Fi

8 posts in this topic

I just wanted to share briefly a game idea that I want to build off of and have already started doing so but wanted to get a general opinion first. So I won't go into every little detail but just the main information.

 

-=STORY=-

Again won't go over it too deeply but basically a scientist is working in his lab, creates a portal, things go wrong and then boom you're in a new dimension on some alien planet. As the portal parts explode and scatter over the lands, you must collect them to re-construct your portal and return home!

 

 

-=GAMEPLAY=-

So upon entering the game you have one life to get the job done. You will start off in a selected pre-made level that will be random (making the game not completely predictable) and will contain the five portal pieces needed in random locations to move onto the next level. So basically you'll need to get each of the portal pieces and when you construct the portal, a boss will spawn and you need to defeat him before entering the portal which will then lead you to the next level which will follow the same idea as before. This will occur three times before a final level but the three will all offer randomly selected themes and designs to keep things fun! As you level up the enemies will as well, but I was also thinking of adding a feature that the longer you are in the level the harder the enemies become which kinda pushes you to hurry and find those portal pieces. Also of course there will be different weapons, unlockables, assisting items and such along the way each time.

 

I just want a general idea on what you think this game could have potential in and what your opinions are in what I have planned so far. Thanks for any feedback given and if you need me to clarifying anything better than just ask!

Edited by CriticallyPixel
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Would this be pseudo-turn based like traditional rogue-like?

 

Overall, it sounds fun but I've never seen a platformer rogue so I'm not sure how well it will work out. How will the battle work out as a platformer?

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Would this be pseudo-turn based like traditional rogue-like?

 

Overall, it sounds fun but I've never seen a platformer rogue so I'm not sure how well it will work out. How will the battle work out as a platformer?

Sorry for the confusion of rogue, by that I meant rogue-like elements such as permanent death and randomized levels. Hope that clears things up a bit :)

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If you level up the enemies as the player levels up, doesn't that defeat the purpose of leveling up and diminish the player's sense of accomplishment? If the point is to keep pressure on the player, I think the timer's effect on enemy difficulty might be the better way to go.

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If you level up the enemies as the player levels up, doesn't that defeat the purpose of leveling up and diminish the player's sense of accomplishment? If the point is to keep pressure on the player, I think the timer's effect on enemy difficulty might be the better way to go.

Yeah this is very true actually...thanks for pointing that out! I'll stick with the timer.

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Have you played Rogue Legacy? It's like Spelunky in that it's a 2D-platformer which prices itself in being unforgiving, but also there are four specific bosses you need to beat (functionally equivalent to your high-level design, really) prior to fighting a final boss then "escaping". You might consider giving it a go for your research. :)

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Have you played Rogue Legacy? It's like Spelunky in that it's a 2D-platformer which prices itself in being unforgiving, but also there are four specific bosses you need to beat (functionally equivalent to your high-level design, really) prior to fighting a final boss then "escaping". You might consider giving it a go for your research. smile.png

Thanks :) I have heard of it but never really have played it. I'm now just looking into this game and is definitely has a similar concept! I will give this game a go and really see how it plays out. Thank you for the recommendation :) 

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