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LiziPizi

I want to develop 3d multiplayer game, how do I start?

11 posts in this topic

You start by figuring out what you actually want to make, rather than just a hodgepodge of bullet points.

 

Then you cry when you realize that what you just described is sort of like walking into NASA and saying "I want to make a rocket ship, how do I start?"

 

EDIT:

 

Okay, that was a bit mean.  What I mean to say is that "3d multiplayer game" isn't really a foundation for help.  You need to decide things in more detail, then decide on what platforms you want to release it on.  Then we can tell you not to do it, and just go make trivial programming exercise games instead to build experience, but that's the way it goes.

Edited by SeraphLance
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You start by figuring out what you actually want to make, rather than just a hodgepodge of bullet points.

 

Then you cry when you realize that what you just described is sort of like walking into NASA and saying "I want to make a rocket ship, how do I start?"

no.....

"how do I start?" more simple then that???

-3

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You start by figuring out what you actually want to make, rather than just a hodgepodge of bullet points.

 

Then you cry when you realize that what you just described is sort of like walking into NASA and saying "I want to make a rocket ship, how do I start?"

no.....

"how do I start?" more simple then that???

 

 

Seriously, you start by throwing away your aspiration and making simpler games.  Maybe that's writing little console games like "guess the number", or maybe it's jumping a bit further ahead and trying to build simple 2D games with tools like Game Maker.

 

3D is hard.  Networking ("Multiplayer") is really hard.  If you have to ask, you're simply not ready for them.

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You start by figuring out what you actually want to make, rather than just a hodgepodge of bullet points.

 

Then you cry when you realize that what you just described is sort of like walking into NASA and saying "I want to make a rocket ship, how do I start?"

no.....

"how do I start?" more simple then that???

 

 

Seriously, you start by throwing away your aspiration and making simpler games.  Maybe that's writing little console games like "guess the number", or maybe it's jumping a bit further ahead and trying to build simple 2D games with tools like Game Maker.

 

3D is hard.  Networking ("Multiplayer") is really hard.  If you have to ask, you're simply not ready for them.

 

Are you serious? throwing away your aspiration?? 

I said how I start creating 3d game not a 2d gamemaker game. I used gamemaker 4 years ago and I made some games with it but I want to start 3d now. You dont have to answer if you can't help couse probably you don't know to create sh!t.

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You need at least a basic understanding of programming languages before you can do that. It's like picking up a guitar and expecting someone to make you Jimi Hendrix just because you can play Smoke on the Water.

 

You're just setting yourself up for a lot of frustration. And you will be pounding your head against the wall all the time. Start simple like the other have suggested. It won't be an awesome 3d multiplayer game, but at least it will be something you have made from scratch.

 

Edited by fluffybeast
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I want to develop 3d multiplayer game, how do I start?

 

1. Develop a single-player 3d game, including all the features you would want a single player to have in a multiplayer game.

2. Add the capability for a second player - decide where the second player is - same keyboard? same machine? on a network? on the web? Add a second set of inputs into your game engine; update both players with information about the other player (position, activity, score, etc.).

3. Extend what you've learned to include additional players.

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One reason you are getting such a negative response is that this sounds essentially like one of the cliche questions by beginners: "I want to make Quake/Half Life/Unreal/Call of Duty". You're not the first person to ask it, you probably won't be the last. It's pretty much impossible to point you in the right direction without knowing more about what you want to do.

 

You could download Unity and make something there to start you off. You could download UDK and do the same thing. You could use an existing 3D graphics engine and networking library. You could learn enough C++ and OpenGL and code the whole thing from scratch. Some of these options are less sane than others, based on what little you've told us, but they're options and it's hard to be more specific without more openness on your part.

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You start by figuring out what you actually want to make, rather than just a hodgepodge of bullet points.

 

Then you cry when you realize that what you just described is sort of like walking into NASA and saying "I want to make a rocket ship, how do I start?"

no.....

"how do I start?" more simple then that???

 

 

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
 
from there it's all downhill, you'll be fine.
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Some of the responses in this thread are less than helpful. rolleyes.gif

Yes, it's probably a bit of a naive question, but instead of asking the OP for more info you just pull out the flamethrowers immediately? unsure.png

@OP - Could you give some more info on your programming experience and what games you have made before? Probably the way to go is going to be to learn some basic programming, to give a decent foundation (if you have not done so already), then move on to making a 2D game, then get a 3D engine, perhaps Unreal Engine 4 or Unity and start following tutorials on it.
3D networked games are really hard. It's a long long long hard road you are about to embark on, but take it one step at a time and maybe, just maybe, with a great deal of time and effort, you can get to the ability required. When it comes time for your final goal - A 3D multiplayer game, you will probably need very good knowledge of whatever engine you're using, the scripting within it and networking and you will still want to put together a team to get the project done with.

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