• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
codegoggles

Where is a good place to start?

6 posts in this topic

I have a basic storyboard written out for a rpg I want to make. Is there a logical next step to take?

What i mean is, what is the general steps one takes to build a game?

When should i start coding?

What do i need to do before hand?

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The exact answer depends on who you are and what you want to accomplish.

 

What do you know how to do? What are your skills? What technology are you going to use? What engine?

 

Story is one part of an RPG, but it's not the most important part. Who is the player? What do they do in the game? What is their moment to moment experience like?

 

Even on my own projects, I usually do some pre-production: I build prototypes of parts of the game, I write up the design doc to force myself to think through the systems and their relationships, I sketch out concept art. If it's just for me, it doesn't have to be too polished, but the idea is to solve problems before I have to undo hours of work to fix them. (If it's a game jam game, that's more like a prototype, but even there I'll usually sketch out something.)

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a basic storyboard written out for a rpg I want to make. Is there a logical next step to take?

 

Dont start with an RPG if this is your first game.

 

 

What i mean is, what is the general steps one takes to build a game?

 

Choose a platform(one is enough:)), choose a programming language(or experiment with a few and see which one works for you). Choose an IDE. Decide which engine/libraries/tools you want to use. ....do a research about them.

 

"When should i start coding?":

Depends. What is your current skill with programming?

1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I understand c++ at probably an intermediate level and I've been learning directx and shaders. I can render, texture and light simple primatives. I also have experience with modeling software. I essentailly want to create a strategic squad based game like X-com but with more rpg elements and character development.

 

 

Who is the player? What do they do in the game? What is their moment to moment experience like?

 

The main character is a sinthetic bred humaniod. Sent to a planet to establish a defensive perimeter and deal with any imposing threats. They will undertake a series of battles with a top down view of the battlefeild positioning the squad and issue attack and defensive orders. When not in battle they will engage in conversations and uncover

intelligence and clues into the storyline. I am going to use manga style characters (think ghost in a shell).

I build prototypes of parts of the game

What sort of prototypes? Do you start trying to implement mechanics and input. Do you work on the interface? Or do you build assets or settings first?

 

Dont start with an RPG if this is your first game.

 

I know its not the smartest idea to start with. And I dont expect great or even good results, its mainly a learning exercise where I can run into roadblocks and then find solutions for them.

Edited by codegoggles
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


What sort of prototypes?

 

A "test game" where you have the basic game mechanics and other core features implemented. ....without any eye-candy, sound, menus. And without any optimizations. The point is to see wheter the game will be fun or not. You dont want to invest months of work into a game just to realize that the core gameplay / "combat system" actually sucks. Once the prototype is done and it seems fun you can start building on it and add the details ....or throw it away and start implementing the real game from scratch(maybe using different tools).

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ok, thankyou both for your time, ill set out making some sketches and prototypes. biggrin.png

Edited by codegoggles
0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The best way to start is the following (though languages/tools differ from person to person, all equally fine):

 

1) Learn C.

2) Learn data structures for learning how to store character inventories, 3d maps, arrays, linked lists, hash maps, etc.

3) Use C for your first 10 games (we're talking Pong, Tetris, small games). Small language, small learning curve, small beginnings.

4) Start looking into C++. Don't go class-crazy at first. Keep things simple. C-89 is the base document of C++, and low-level programming is still often found in C++ programs.

5) Use the knolwedge that you learned for your RPG. Think of all you learned as the foundation for your RPG. Nothing is a waste of time. Everything adds to your long-term project.

 

Good luck!

Edited by shinypixel
1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0