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Acharis

Skills

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Players can have WORKSHOPS (blacksmith, mill, carpenter workshop, tailor workshop, etc), there are PRODUCTS (iron ingots - made from iron ore, tools - made from iron ingots, etc), there are SKILLS (list below) that affect the crafting efficiency.

 

Now, I have a problem with naming these skills. As you see (below) some are simply names of the workshop type, some are names of products... Not consistent at all and overall messy :) How to name these?

 

The theme of the game is medieval (in case it matters).

 

 

Baking bread
Cheese making
Apiarist
Oil making
Milling (flour making)
Carpentry
Smelting
Blacksmith
Jeweller
Tannery
Weaving
Dyeing
Tailor
Shoemaking
Bricks making
Pottery making
Paper making
Brewing beer
Brewing wine
Candle making
Saddle making
Weapon crafting
Armour crafting

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Hmmm, I think I would go for TASK.

 

Note there are also other (non crafting skills), I named these:

- Education

- Theology

- Music

- Law

I guess these are/sound sort of "task" too.

 

Specific questions:

- Tannery - shouldn't it be Tanning? (I'm not a native English speaker)

- Blacksmith - is it really a name of a task? Not just a profession? Isn't it "blacksmithing" or something?

- Milling (flour making) - should I use just "Milling" maybe? Is it sufficiently clear that it is to produce flour?

- Apiarist/Beekeeping - I have a problem here, you actually go to a forest and gather honey combs, then you extract the honey combs and make honey (both these actions use "Apiarist" skill). The thing is, you techically do not keep any bees, so "Beekeeping" is not correct/is misleading.

- Should I use more "___ making" or "___ crafting"?

 

 

Subclasses - no, there are no subclasses here. Each skill is completely independent/separate.

 

Smelting, Jewelry, Blacksmith - These are special case, generally you use blacksmith skill to do everything related to iron, EXCEPT smelting iron ore into iron ingots shoich use smelting. Similarly the same smelting skill is used to smelt precous ores by the jeweller to make jewelry. I found out it's quite confusing to players... I wonder, should I remove smelting and just use blacksmith/jewelry for ingots as well?

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This is a quite big list of skills, and on many I don't really see how one could conceptually "level" or how once could conceptually produce better output since it depends on the inputs.

 

Can't you batch together a few of these (without losing "game value")? Maybe with specilalisations or "craft plans", so you can for example buy leatherworking if you have tailoring, so you can tailor cloth and leather?

 

Dyeing - Amount depends on the amount of ingredients, how do you produce more dye? Need to gather more flowers or acorns, or ... stuff.

Apiarist - Does not tend bees (you explicitly said so) but just collects honey combs in forest. Which is basically "gathering". You can't make more honey out of the same amount of honey combs.

Milling - Same. Amount depends on the amount of wheat (or some other cereal), which is generated by farming, or well... some form of gathering. Also a level 50 miller can't make more flour than a level 1 miller, obviously.

Tannery - Depends on the amount of hides (... animal tending) and involves the actual tanning, but otherwise pretty much identical to tailoring.

Saddle making - Subclass of tannery.

Cheese making - Depends on the amount of milk. So... animal tending, or gathering. Or, like brewing beer and baking bread, cooking or foraging in a wider sense.

Edited by samoth
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This is a quite big list of skills, and on many I don't really see how one could conceptually "level" or how once could conceptually produce better output since it depends on the inputs.
Skills reduce stamina required for crafting (it's for an existing game http://europe1300.eu it all works), it does not affect input nor output (it would make no sense in most cases as you said), it only affects time (stamina used). I'm just in need of naming these properly :)
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No, no, by Law/Theology/Music I meant these were the actual names of "skills" they tought in universities in that era, so I can't change these. And these are "tasks" not "professions" (Theology, not Theologist). Therefore, I think I make all remaing skills "task" too I suppose?

 

 

Anyway, here is an improved list of skills (switched to "task"):

Digging
Mining
Wood cutting
Hunting
Fishing
Baking bread
Cheese making
! Apiarist !!!
Oil making
Milling
Carpentry
Smelting
Forging
Jewelry
Tanning
Weaving
Dyeing
! Tailor !!!
Shoe making
Bricks making
Pottery making
Paper making
Brewing beer
Brewing wine
Candle making
Saddle making
Weapon crafting
Armour crafting

 

 

Personally, I dislike seeing a long list of "______ [word]" regardless of what [word] is. I, as a non-professional hobbyist game designer, would prefer single-words to double-word tasks, unless the single-words aren't descriptive enough. Tossing in a few "______ [word]" into the list is fine to me, but then I'd vary up what the [word] is, depending on context.
Well, I have a small problem here, a lot (most) of target players are not necessarily proficient in English (and translation will be provided to some languages only and can be available much later), so "___ [word]" is much easier to understand by that players...

 

 

You'd have to figure out why it's confusing. Is it actually "confusing", or do they just not like it? What don't they like about it - is it too time-consuming, do they feel the 'smelting' skill is too limited in use that they are wasting skill points on it?
It's confusing because all other crafdting skills cower the whole workshop, while Jeweller/Balcksmith have a subskill of sort that affects only smelting. Plus, when I'm using "Blacksmith" the natural expectation is it to contain *all* the skills a blacksmith needs... Above I changed Blacksmith to Forging so Forging+Smelting would sound better I suppose (but what about Jewelly, it still needs a Smelting skill.

Of course I could just discard Smelting and include it into Forging/Jewelry.

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OK, I got almost all done (BTW, thanks, it was helpful). Now I still wonder about honey. The thing is, the skill is used for two things, gathering and extracting. I'm more interested in the extracting part. The process is like that: you get a honey comb and "process" it to get honey and wax. How to call such skill?

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'Honey forager' is one option. 'forager' implies gathering, but can include processing.

 

'Honey harvesting' or 'Honey extraction' also would work.

'Beehive processing' or similar variations would de-emphasize honey specifically.

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