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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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shinypixel

What's the modern setup with OpenGL and the Win32 API?

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It's been some years since I touched OpenGL, and I'm wanting to relearn it and apply it to my library written in C++/Win32 API. I know OpenGL has gone through some changes, so I'm assuming my header and lib files are probably out of date. According to my computer, I have OpenGL version 3.1.

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#include <D3D11.h> // I'm being facetious of course... or am I?

I find the easiest way to use GL (on Windows or elsewhere) is via a windowing/input library like SDL2 or GLFW or SFML. Combine these with GLEW to access all of GL. Avoid GLUT or FreeGLUT.

I find GLFW easiest to use for small-medium uses. It lets you concentrate on just GL without any other fluff. SDL2 is my preferred "whole package" library, though some C++ users have a strong preference for SFML and it's C++-iness (which I find is more baggage than help given that I write my own high-level wrappers anyway, but that's me).

http://lazyfoo.net/tutorials/SDL/ I've heard this site recommended. It has plenty of SDL2 tutorials. Lessons 01, 03, 04, 49, and 50 and probably the most relevant to you.

GLFW's documentation should be all you need to get up and running with it on GL; it's that simple. In particular, the tutorial covers almost everything you need to know (aside from using GLEW, but there's not much to that).
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Thanks for the recommendations, though I have my own library with the Win32 API similar to SFML, though it doesn't have a name yet. "Awesome" sounds like a good name though. I enjoyed SFML in the past, but I kept dropping into OS-specific code because SFML had no way to call them (it has to stay portable, so they just give you the window handle to deal with things they haven't implemented), so that was a drawback for myself. Since I'm dropping into OS-specific code, I figured I mind as well use the Win32 API in full to take advantage of the system. However, it made me a better OS programmer and less dependent on high abstractions, and now it looks like SFML. I still enjoy the benefits of SFML and I'm looking forward to their iOS release. DirectX is great too, but my career interest requires an understanding of OpenGL/OpenGL:ES. Anyway, enough thinking there. Tools are great, but one must decide what is needed for any given application.

 

Speaking of that, so what I need is GLEW for C++/Win32 API?

Edited by shinypixel
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Speaking of that, so what I need is GLEW for C++/Win32 API?


It just handles wrapping the extension API in order to expose the functionality of your driver. Especially on Windows, as Microsoft only support GL 1.2 in their SDK, requiring you to use the extension API to access any newer functionality. It's handy on other platforms, too, but it (or a library like it) is for all intents and purposes mandatory on Windows.
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