• Announcements

    • khawk

      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
CodeReaver

Assimp with Visual Studio Express 2013 and CMake

5 posts in this topic

Hi,

 

I'm trying to compile assimp for use in Visual Studio Express 2013 on Windows 8 and I'm having trouble getting CMake to build the project.

 

I attempted to follow this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_vjs0cH8qls, however because of updates to CMake (which I've never used before) on assimp itself, I'm unable to create the make file.  I downloaded the source only file from here http://sourceforge.net/projects/assimp/files/assimp-3.0/ and since the generator in CMake complained I hadn't set any compilers and didn't give me anywhere to set them and the only compliers I know are on my machine are in VS Express, I chose the generator for that instead.  I then got a few errors about DirectX 9, which dissapeared once I disabled BUILD_ASSIMP_TOOLS and errors about boost being missing which dissapeared once I downloaded that or enabled the workaround option.  After generating the files, the make file wasn't included, so I was unable to start the project.

 

After that, I just tried to upgrade the VC9 solution that was included with the source code, and that didn't work because it always wanted to build the tools version and had undefined variables anyway.

 

I finally considered downloading assimp-sdk-3.0-setup.exe and using either the dll or the libraries, but I'm not used to setting those up other than for DirectX, which I can't remember if it just hooks everything up itself when installed or what to do otherwise.

 

I ultimately don't mind how I get it working as long as I can incorporate the model loading functionality into the project I've set up.  Has anyone gotten this working with Visual Studio Express 2013 on Windows 8 who can let me know a simple way of doing so?

 

Sorry if I'm not supposed to embed  the youtube video.  I didn't know how to prevent it.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only thing I could suggest for this is to download a previous version of Visual Studio that the assimp solution will properly work for and then compile the libraries in that. i.e. I think 2010 and 2012 will work. 

 

Not a solution but is a potential work around :) 

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have you tried to start the cmake run in a visual studio console?

 

Kimmi

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why are you building it yourself? It comes with the necessary lib files for x64 and x86 - you simply need to add the libraries to your project..

 

Also you will have to add the assimp32 or assimp64 dll file (located in the bin/x86 or bin/x64 folders respectively) to the same folder where visual studio puts your build exe file

 

To include the libraries just uncompress the sdk to some folder like c:\Assimp

Then add the include path for assimp to the include path for VS2013

To do this right click on your project in solution explorer, go to properties and under Configuration Properties go to VC++ Directories

 

Under "Include Directories" add the c:\Assimp\Include (or wherever yours is at) folder

Now under "Library Directories" add "c:\Assimpl\lib\x86" assuming you want to use the 32 bit version

Now click on "Linker" in the left pane and add "assimp.lib" to the Additional Dependencies section

 

Finally go to your Assimp\bin\x86 folder and grab the Assimp32.dll and put it wherever the program your writing's exe is at

 

I am not using the brand new assimp library - but a recent version (from a few months ago) so the procedure should be the same

 

To use assimp just #include <assimp/whatever assimp file you need>

 

Hope that helps - if you already know all this then sorry!

Edited by EarthBanana
2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites


Why are you building it yourself? It comes with the necessary lib files for x64 and x86 - you simply need to add the libraries to your project.
Generally, you shouldn't mix runtimes. That is, it is not safe to use a library that has been linked with a MSVCRT (MS Visual C Runtime) version other then the one you're linking with yourself. And each release of VS has its own version of runtime.

 

If a library doesn't provide a binary version linked with your runtime, you have no choice but to build the library yourself.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've built Assimp 3.1.1 (the latest) on Windows 8 using Visual Studio 2013 Desktop Express.

 

I'm no CMake expert, but I just downloaded the latest version of that and pointed it at hthe root of the Assimp 3.1.1 source directory and it managed to generate solution and project files for VS 2013 Desktop Express.

 

I briefly confused myself by pointing CMake at the \Code subdirectory, but once corrected, it all worked fine.

 

I already had the last DirectX release (June 2010) installed on my machine, so perhaps that helped it go smoothly.

 

Only bit of advice I can give from a CMake newbie is to completely clear its cache if you stuff something up, as incorrect settings will hang around otherwise. I think I may have even paranoidly uninstalled it and reinstalled it, after realising I was pointing at the wrong Assimp directory.

 

This post has reminded me how fun it is to say and type Assimp. So, thank you.

0

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0