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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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moeen k

need artistic view on lightening and texture

7 posts in this topic

hi. as all of know lightening is a great feature in game graphic as many peaople believe that great graphic of battlefield new series are mostlly for its lightening. and itt helps so much to have effective environment. i have no information on its technicals and speciially i work on udk and ue4 and i just use it when really there is like lamps and world dominant light but how should i work to it look better and in best way. for example in games like divission or the last of us or bf 4 and bf 3 when sun light comes through window it just not a dominant light that is everywhere.

my next question is about texturing llimitations that makes your game special. for example in games like tearaway or the last of us or borderlands for theme of their game they didnt use every texture. something like textures are painted and they produced themselves those textures. am i right?

ill be gratefull if give me information or introduce some books or article or link. thank you for helping

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please. there is no one to help me an art direction? i dont think its a weired or stupid question

To be honest, the question is really unspecific. Do you mean the photorealistic art direction in current AAA titles ? This is a huge field, often there are more than 200 people working at top AAA titles, many, if not most, of them being artists. There are a lot of specialist artists running around, field of specialisation:

- concept art

- sculpting

- technical artist

- modelling

- texturing

- character artist

- environment artist

- property artist

- level designer

- lighting artist

- animation

- UI art

 

Here are two free artbooks, containing many tutorials of professional artist. They might provide you with some insign.

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Hi,

 

The norm is that 2D and 3D art assets are created in a comprehensive software with settings for lighting which are standard in the industry or at least standard to the target game engine.  As an artist, if the game engine allows, then I may control the parameters of lighting for each model or even for each individual surface polygon of each model in extreme customization if I desire and the performance of the game and game engine will allow it.

 

Examples are that I can make a surface translucent or transparent as I manipulate it in the 3D software (such as Blender or Maya, for example). I could also select all surfaces of the model to apply a light feature.  In this case, a common one is to control the color and/or amount of diffuse lighting of an object. This setting is the total basic lighting that is reflected or emitted from an object, but not the shine or transparency which are two other settings. The settings are applied to the model and saved in little files, usually within the model folder itself but sometimes external if the game engine calls for that. The model folder is typically dropped into a class folder to be read as a class. The game engine will read all contents of the model folder and rasterize to screen. Animations, collision, and damage model can potentially be included in the model folder, as well.  Other characteristics of the model can be contained in the model folder, too, such as textures, bump mappings, and custom vehicle or character physics.  These can be internal or external to the model in theoretically any combination that the game engine allows.  Generally if a feature is not used by the game engine then it simply ignores the folder and files since it does not recognize them.  Your game source code is what ties everything together in actual game functionality that the end-user and operating system needs for a game to be compiled, executed at runtime, and manipulated by the end-user gamer.

 

If the workflow pipeline is assembled correctly, then the game engine will accept the art assets well.  The game developer then writes coding in the game source code which tells the game engine what to do. In some game engines, it is also possible to write game source coding automatically in WYSIWYG fashion, such as with the Blender game engine that uses nodes to show the developer what is going to happen in the game functionality and writes coding according to it. On the other extreme, some people write all low level and high level coding, but why try to reinvent the wheel?

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thank you my friends. i got my answer to art design but still there are some questions on lighting but i cant ask it generally and i say it as examples and that is about lighting techniques. for example for a long time lightmaps are being used in video games but still there are a lot of problems in them and how you should deal with them or in udk for sunlight we use one dominant light but it never gives you a good refelction and efect in for example windows and objects or in the place that there is no light source how to set lights that it be good looking but still it be natural that there is no light and a lot of these kinf o question that i dont remember now. i think there are some techniques that it doesnt depend on proggram or engine we work. i read an article from mark iwanaki graphic proggramer of naughty dog on the last of us that had explained those techniques in that game very well but i dont think it was the all thing. can anyone introduce me some good book or article resorces or that is just something can be achieved with exprience? thank you for helping

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Here are two free artbooks, containing many tutorials of professional artist. They might provide you with some insign.

These books seem very interesting, thank you for bringing them out.
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for example for a long time lightmaps are being used in video games but still there are a lot of problems in them and how you should deal with them or in udk for sunlight we use one dominant light but it never gives you a good refelction and efect in for example windows and objects or in the place that there is no light source how to set lights that it be good looking but still it be natural that there is no light and a lot of these kinf o question that i dont remember now. i think there are some techniques that it doesnt depend on proggram or engine we work. i read an article from mark iwanaki graphic proggramer of naughty dog on the last of us that had explained those techniques in that game very well but i dont think it was the all thing. can anyone introduce me some good book or article resorces or that is just something can be achieved with exprience? thank you for helping

 

Once you get that detailed then the exact implementation techniques become particular to your own workflow pipeline. For example, there are a variety of lighting implementation techniques and combinations of them across game engines. 

 

That said, look for "local lighting" or similar terms for the software in your pipeline.  Lighting can be control directly in the game engine software, by 3D modeling programs, or the most common way by both of these. For example, in 3ds Max a light can be custom created for a game if the game engine being targeted will import such lighting models.  Blender can do this, too.

 

Once you get highly detailed with these pipeline issues, then you need to do more research by asking questions from the online forum communities which use the software, tools, and techniques that you are. Of course you can find some of that here and hopefully a UDK user will read this and help.

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