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Arsoul

Game Development - Where to start?

16 posts in this topic

So I'm 20 years old and am looking at going back to TAFE to study a new course in July. I have previously studied a Diploma of Information Technoloy and am really interested in getting into Game Development. What I'm curious about is where is the correct place to begin? Is it better for me to do some specialised Game Dev course at a college, or is it better to do something like a diploma in Software Development? I'm really lost in trying to find where to start, any advice would be appreciated.

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With the background you've provided I find a bit difficult to understand your situation and your interests. For instance, I'm not sure if you know to program (I guess so because you have that diploma in IT, but again I'm not sure what knowledge is supposed to provide a diploma in IT) or in which field of game development you are interested.

 

By the way, if you already have a universitary degree I wouldn't spend much money in anything I could learn with a computer and internet connection (I mean I would search for some simple game tutorials and try to go forward on my own before thinking of doing any game dev course). But that's only my opinion, after all, I'm just the new guy here.

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Hi Arsoul, I think I know where you're coming from. Before doing a Computer Game related degree at a well known university I studied Computing & IT. The Computer Game related degree had more complex programming as well as learning other new skills. Going to do a Computer Game related qualification is good because you get to study with like minded individuals in a focused environment but it all depends if you can afford it or not. After university there are Student Loans and such to worry about.

 

Like Avalander says you can teach yourself from the internet; either that or books. Sometimes it may be best to work with what you've got and develop a portfolio in your own time if possible. 

 

All that aside a Computer Game related course can help you get on your way to learning what you need but making some demo programs and putting them on a site is a good way to get noticed. There are also various expos and such you can showcase work if you feel confident enough to show off your work when ready.

 

Most importantly you should get a grasp on the programming/scripting language(s) you wish to develop games in.

 

Hope that helps.

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I would decide what language you want to use and just make a game in your free time. Starting with something simple like Pong, then moving onto more complex games.

 

It will give you a chance to decide whether or not you enjoy game development (which you probably will).

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So I'm 20 years old and am looking at going back to TAFE to study a new course in July. I have previously studied a Diploma of Information Technoloy and am really interested in getting into Game Development.

 

Hold on.  There is a big difference between loving games and making them.  There are many parts of game development, such as programming, design, art, testing, and marketing.  But programming is programming, and whether you're making a game or a business module, it can be hard, frustrating work.

 

My suggestion is work through some online classes to see if this stuff is for you.

 

http://www.indiegameprogramming.com/Resources.php

Checkout the links in the beginner's section.

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Have you tried Googling this question?  I mean, not like it's already been asked and answered a million times or anything...

Actually scratch that.  Don't go into game development.  If you can't be bothered to research issues yourself and instead expect everyone else to do the work for you, you're not going to make a good programmer.

Edited by Uberwulu
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Have you tried Googling this question?  I mean, not like it's already been asked and answered a million times or anything...

Actually scratch that.  Don't go into game development.  If you can't be bothered to research issues yourself and instead expect everyone else to do the work for you, you're not going to make a good programmer.

 

I think you misunderstood the topic here. The OP was asking whether he should go with a regular CS course or a specialized game development one. Please read the question first.

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I believe the conventional wisdom passed around here is to get a CS degree as it's likely to keep you open to a broader range of industries.

However, "Getting into Game Development," can mean different things though. There's differences in what you'll want to look into if you want to just make a game, get hired by a AAA studio, or go the indie route with your own studio (hopefully a profitable one).

What is it exactly that you want to do?

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Go for the CS degree. I went for a general game design degree (the Game and Simulation Programming degree (Bachelor of Science) from DeVry University) and honestly, I didn't learn anything I didn't already know from 20 years of programming and reading game dev sites. In the end, the thing that gets me is that I have no confidence in my abilities so I never try to get a job in the industry as a programmer anymore.

Edited by BHXSpecter
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My diploma was specialized on networking and support, I did bits and pieces of programming and find it interesting. I'll definitely check out these links and see how things go and might look further into a course for next semester. Thanks very much for the advice, much appreciated.

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Keep in mind the merit of pre-job learning is usually a combination of: a. paper to demonstrate your ability to stay focused and finish a course, and b. dealing with problems and schedules put forth by other people and having to learn to deal with them, similar to how you would be given work in a job.

 

What it really boils down to is that from what I've seen many people that have tried each path, the consensus seems to point more towards taking a general CS degree over a specialized one. Assuming you're doing programming you're going to be learning software development either way. One degree is more valuable in a wide array of fields while the more specialized one may turn some heads but will probably in most cases not garner significantly more attention than a standard CS degree.

 

Remember both of these things are just a way in the door, once you get a job most people will almost completely ignore your educational credentials over your work experience anyway, the same with getting a high GPA at a university, its all for that first job. I won't tell you that you HAVE to get a CS degree, but just think about your choices and which one would make you the most happy to actually work through.

 

Really you can get a job as long as you -really- want it, different paths just give you more steps to jump on.

Edited by Satharis
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Have you tried Googling this question?  I mean, not like it's already been asked and answered a million times or anything...

Actually scratch that.  Don't go into game development.  If you can't be bothered to research issues yourself and instead expect everyone else to do the work for you, you're not going to make a good programmer.

 

I think you misunderstood the topic here. The OP was asking whether he should go with a regular CS course or a specialized game development one. Please read the question first.

 

I did.  No part of my post indicates that I didn't.  This question has been asked and answered countless times before.  You seem to have the same disability as the OP.

Edited by Uberwulu
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My diploma was specialized on networking and support, I did bits and pieces of programming and find it interesting. I'll definitely check out these links and see how things go and might look further into a course for next semester. Thanks very much for the advice, much appreciated.

 

Ah. I see. If you want to do game dev, then you should take game dev (programming) courses.

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Have you tried Googling this question?  I mean, not like it's already been asked and answered a million times or anything...

Actually scratch that.  Don't go into game development.  If you can't be bothered to research issues yourself and instead expect everyone else to do the work for you, you're not going to make a good programmer.

 

I think you misunderstood the topic here. The OP was asking whether he should go with a regular CS course or a specialized game development one. Please read the question first.

 

I did.  No part of my post indicates that I didn't.  This question has been asked and answered countless times before.  You seem to have the same disability as the OP.

 

 

Actually, your link indicates that.

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Go online learn a few tutorials and use your knowledge to make a game. You may need to keep researching the meaning of stuff but it will only make you a better coder. After you've been through some tutorial you should finally start making you're game but work off of someone else code first. I feel real proud of the AI I struggled to create over the month but I understand everything so much better now.

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