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murdock

Foundations of 3D Game development tutorial(s) ?

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I've been working primarily in 2D games for the last few years off and on, and have decided I'd like to take a crack at doing 3D development.  My problem is that I have several questions and I'm not sure where to start looking for answers.

 

For example, I am pretty sure that in 3D development you have a scene that uses a scene graph to store all the objects in the "world."  This is where all your models would be stored.  

 

Now when I go to build/import models into that world and store them, what do I need to have in my model?  I am under the impression that this is a model that is built in blender or some similar application.  Do I need to have the modeler add animations, rigging, etc?  In other words, what do I need to know in order to speak intelligently with a 3D modeler to request game assets?  Also if my scene is a town, do I need to make the town one big model or can I break it up into smaller models?

 

These are a few of the questions that I have and would like to find a good resource where I can do some self study.

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I'm actually going to be building a game using Unity.  The goal is to ultimately have a 3D game; however, I'll be taking it slowly and using the game as my classroom so to speak. 

 

Now is there a difference between rigging and animating?

 

Thank you for answering my questions. 

Edited by murdock

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"Rigging" generally refers to setting up the skeleton of bones, and connecting them in relevant ways to the mesh. "Animating" is a broader term that includes a lot of animation-related activities in some cases, but is also used to refer specifically to making the sequences of motion that will eventually be displayed.

 

Going with Unity is a good advantage since there are ample artists out there who know how to build assets for that engine. This gives you time to get the other fundamentals down without having to dive too deep into esoterica like file formats, exporter plugins, data conversion systems, and so on. Of course should you find any of that stuff interesting there is always a chance to dig into it as far as you'd like.

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