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Hodgman

OpenGL What OpenGL book do you recommend for experts?

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In the same vein as this post: http://www.gamedev.net/topic/656791-what-good-opengl-book-do-you-recommend-for-beginners/

 

Except I'm looking for a GL book for someone who already knows how to use a dozen other graphics APIs, and just wants:

  • a good way to translate their knowledge of other APIs to OpenGL's worldview,
  • a good reference for GL features,
  • and a guide for how to find the "fast path" in the GL quagmire.

At the moment I'm thinking of getting these:

OpenGL Insights

OpenGL Programming Guide

 

Something like MJP and JasonZ's D3D book ("Practical Rendering & Computation with Direct3D11") would be nice biggrin.png

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I found Insights to be supremely useful -- you probably already know how closely Riccio follows the state of the industry with regards to OpenGL. Of course the big problem is that any book with too many concrete recommendations is likely doomed, given the quicksand shifting of drivers, implementations, and specs in current day GL. There's too much space for stale information.

Edited by Promit

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Another tip is to do a GL Intercept log of what the latest id Software engine does, because they're going to be the paths that vendors will be optimizing around.

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Another tip is to do a GL Intercept log of what the latest id Software engine does, because they're going to be the paths that vendors will be optimizing around.

 

I'd replace "id Software" with "Unreal Engine" but the advice is fine.

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Another tip is to do a GL Intercept log of what the latest id Software engine does, because they're going to be the paths that vendors will be optimizing around.

 

I'd replace "id Software" with "Unreal Engine" but the advice is fine.

 

 

Depends.

 

On Windows the Unreal engine is still D3D, isn't it?  And that's exactly the combination of platforms where 95% of your OpenGL driver problems are going to be coming from.  So since id Software and the last major users of OpenGL on Windows (at least so far as games are concerned) then their engines are the ones that vendors will be making sure work.

 

For other OSs where OpenGL is the only option I'd say something like Unity may be a better bet, but unless you're certain that you're going to have a significant number of users on those OSs you'll probably be focussing on Windows.

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ATI (AMD?) Render Monkey is a software that has gl/dx version of every shader and workspace, it comes with SDK as well. I would also read OpenGL ES specification compared to OpenGL to spot what is native and apreciated for Khronos philosophies. Besides that, I would compare GLSL versioning  (wiki is rich on that particulary). 

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You should really start with OpenGL 3+ since OpenGL 2 is old, fixed function pipeline is old and.... Wait, wait, *looks at title* Oops, wrong thread.

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