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questionsaboutgames

How to get started learning Unity?

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What is the best way(s) to get started learning Unity? I find it very overwhelming to learn this software. Specifically, I want to learn to use Unity to make 2D physics based games if that helps. Thank you.

Edited by questionsaboutgames
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Or if you have a budget, you could try Gamemaker Studio.  It does 2d games generally better and easier than Unity, including physics based games.  It has a price tag though, and you wouldn't be able to go 3d with the same software like with Unity.  And Unity is free for the most part too.  But it isn't as good for 2d, and it is generally harder to learn and use, so if it overwhelming you it could be better to go with something easier.

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My first project in it was a 2d game, and this tutorial helped me quite a bit to get started: http://pixelnest.io/tutorials/2d-game-unity/. Mainly in showing me how things are connected in unity in a general sense, after that its just a matter of setting a small first game as a goal for your self and asking questions on the way.

 

If you have ever coded before, once you know how unity operates, it is very easy to pick up the rest.

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You will not be spending your days writing 2D manipulation code and 2D graphics. You will be building game behavior systems instead
It is okay to spend time on the game instead of the back end code...
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I think everyone can learn via tutorial on Unity Learn

https://unity3d.com/learn/tutorials/modules/beginner/2d

You can see video and source code download from assetserver. It's free.

 

I also just learned unity  two month and did a android game on google play.

Inspired by "Charlie Circus" relased by Nintendo.

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=jp.nestudio.flappylion

 

 

My experience is that you learn and try to do a simple product.

Edited by lkingnight
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You will not be spending your days writing 2D manipulation code and 2D graphics. You will be building game behavior systems instead
It is okay to spend time on the game instead of the back end code...

 

 

Ofcourse it is, in any real world project you don't want to reinvent the wheel unless you have to. (Having your programmers spend time writing animation systems, physics engines, resources "managers", level editors, etc isn't a good use of their time if there are pre-built solutions that meet your needs)

 

For learning purposes however you often want to reinvent the wheel (it is a good way to get a better understanding of how the wheel works) and then its better to build things from scratch instead and only use third party libraries for the portions you're not interested in at the moment.

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I'm pretty okay with lkingnight.

Tutorial on unity learn are really great.

If you want to create 2d game, I specially recommend you download, try and watch the code of "Unity Projects: 2D Platformer".

With Unity, you only have to understand some concepts (like components, gameobject, prefab, ...) and you can do anything you want.

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Hello, 

 

I recently tried gamemaker studio and I was able to make a 2d game on it. I was a complete novice to game making meaning no coding experience, no art experience, no nothing. It is rather easy to use if i was able to figure out and make a casual game. Thus, I support the suggestion to try gamemaker studio, you can get a free version off steam that will allow only 5 objects but can give you a sneak peak. 

 

I am currently attempting to learn Unity now . . . the best tutorials for unity are the ones that are made for your brain. How do you know which ones are made for your brain? Keep googling them till you find one that works, the official unity website is excellent though. 

 

Thanks. Sincerely, 

 

Cryomatrix

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But for programmers working alone who want to learn to program, Unity almost does too much for you.

 

Very true and nicely said frob. If you're goal is to learn to program, I too recommend messing directly with C# before jumping into Unity because it will spoil you. :) It reminds me of learning the fundamental theorem of calculus before learning about the Power Rule. 

 

- Eck

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