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trevorchough

Language Choice

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I'm currently trying to figure out what language I should try to learn in order to start game programming. To be honest, the only game programming experience I have, would be DarkBASIC Pro. I know a lot of people don't even consider that a language, but more or less a framework, used to create simple games or demos. I have web programming skills, such as HTML/CSS, but other than that I'm pretty much starting fresh. Are there any languages you could suggest based on the information I've given? I am a relatively fast learner and difficult tasks do not bother me. Also, I would like to mention, I have fooled around with game engines like Irrlicht, Cube and a few tools like Unity and UDK, but with no real programming knowledge I haven't really gotten very far with any of those. Thanks in advance for any friendly suggestions!

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In the professional world of interactive media and games, C/C++ are the main choice.

However for indie game development, you are very much constrained to what your tool of choice uses. For example with Unity you are going to be looking at .NET languages (C#, UnityScript, Boo). Likewise, the "Indie" version of UDK 3.x would require UnrealScript.

Many of the more open-source engines and tools allow you to use C++ (as well as other languages with bindings) including the very latest UDK 4.x (if you subscribe for source access).

So the question really is. Out of all the engines you have had a play with. Which do you prefer? Then pretty much go with whatever language it best supports. Edited by Karsten_

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Kirk,

 

I have created a slew of games in DarkBASIC and I actually enjoy programming in DarkBASIC. The only reason to move away from DB is because of the lack of support for certain file formats and functions. However, after doing some research, it seems there is actually a product developed by The Game Creators (makers of DarkBASIC) called Dark GDK, which allows me to actually use Visual Studio and C++ with DarkBASIC kind of "inside" of it. Simply put, I can still program in DarkBASIC but have the abilities to use C++ programming where/if needed. Now with this, would I be able to implement support for file formats previously unsupported in DarkBASIC? What would the advantages be to have DarkBASIC inside of C++? Also, there is a .NET version of Dark GDK, allowing me to use either C# or Visual BASIC.net, would one of those suite my needs better? Sorry if these questions seem rather unimportant or noobish, but, I have to start somewhere so I might as well ask as many questions as I can now so I don't end up having to ask them later and looking like a fool!

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I've just discovered some "expansions" for DarkGDK, located here http://www.thegamecreators.com/?m=view_product&id=2128&page=expand, that introduce some desirable features that I no longer have to worry about coding myself. I think I have honestly solved my own question, and found that with previous DarkBASIC Pro experience, Dark GDK might be the next step in my game programming adventures! I'm downloading now and going to give it a try. But I am still open for suggestions and any advice anyone may have!

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trevorchough,

 

Although I do not know much about DarkGDK, I believe it sounds like a good option for you to learn a new language while still having the methods you are familiar with from creating games in DarkBASIC.

 

I am not sure this will allow you to use different file types, this all depends on how the methods have been designed. VB.NET will be closer to what you are familiar with but if you have a reason to learn a dialect of C I would recommend C#.

 

Good luck with DarkGDK, let us know how you get on.

 

Kirk

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Well, so far, I am having a couple of problems. I have downloaded Visual Studio Express 2008, the only version that works with DarkGDK, at least from what I've read after various Google searches. My problem is that I don't know how to include the DarkGDK folder, so that when I go to compile, the "include.h" and other files from DarkGDK are detected without manually putting them in the project folder themselves. 

 

My second issue is that, after compiling a simple test program that spins a cube at a very slow rate (I have even tried using the minimum spin rate value), the cube is spinning at the maximum value. Now this can be caused by a few different problems, or so I've read, that can consist of driver problems to DarkBASIC issues with Windows 8.

 

The later issue I will/should be able to resolve on my own, however, I do need help with setting the include/library folders in a Visual Studio project.

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If you have followed the instructions here

#t=175 you should be able to use the GDK templates within VS.

 

Kirk

 

Thanks, Kirk, I haven't had the time to look for any instructions other than the five minutes I had earlier to tell you the problem and ask for help here on the forums. I appreciate the link, that will save me time, you're a great help!

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I personally get sick of C++ until it starts working again. Then I love it for a few minutes, then repeat. I think DarkBASIC is a good starting point.

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