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      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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nivek311

Resume building jobs and activities for a school project.

3 posts in this topic

I am finishing up my senior project for school and I am having problems thinking of answers to a couple of questions. They are asking about jobs and non paid activities that will help me build up a resume for the career I want to pursue after high school. The problem I'm having is that I imagine that few jobs that don't involve actual programming are going to help qualify me for a video game programming job. As far as unpaid activities go I don't have a guess.

 

If you could, please list a few ideas for me to write about.

 

The questions are as follows:

 

"Think of three jobs you should try to get to build skills related to your career objective. Tell how each is related to your potential career."

 

"Think of three unpaid activities you should try to build skills related to your career objective. Tell how each would relate to your career and strengthen your resume."

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One unpaid activity is to keep programming and studying in your spare time. wink.png

Another would be to work on mods or open source projects that you can add to your resume, as well as to get a little team experience.

 

Freelance web design involving scripting languages like Javascript might be a "job" that could somewhat help.

Edited by Servant of the Lord
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Are these jobs to work up to your dream job? Or jobs to work up to an entry level position in your desired field?

 

If it's the latter, then that's a bit more difficult. One such position that I personally held was a Java teaching assistant at university. I assisted the professor in lecturing (when he was away or sick) held office hours to help students with their work and graded assignments. While I didn't realise it at first, I was actually learning useful code review skills, mentoring skills, communication skills, and knowledge transfer skills which are applicable to my current job (Gameplay animation software engineer).

 

If it's the former, this is a bit easier. Generally a dream job isn't "game programmer", but somethine more specific with higher qualifications. Such as Animation Lead Software Engineer, or Lead Rendering Engineer, or lead AI engineer, or even CTO (chief technical officer in charge of driving technology planning for the whole company). If this is the case, it would be jobs such as junior programmer, gameplay generalist programmer, domain expert programmer (ai, animation, rendering, online, etc.). The job titles would be different from company to company, but they would be something like that.

 

 

 

Unpaid activities could include, as Servant suggested, working on open source projects, working on hobby projects, reading domain relevant books (non-course related). All stuff that continues to be valuable to do even upon getting the job you want.

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Thanks.

 

Cardinal, I believe I was looking for something to aim for an entry level position. Mostly because I don't know enough about the different jobs yet to really know which is best for me. I think I would enjoy something related to the realism of the game, at least for the games that are supposed to be realistic. I imagine they have programmers that have to job of making the physics within the game realistic. For example if I were hired to work on a driving game I would like to have a job related to making the driving as realistic as possible.

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