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NewVoxel

Is your IDE hot or not?

25 posts in this topic

I’m a typeface geek, and when it comes to selecting a font I’ll stare at all day, I tend to be pretty picky. Recently, when I discovered that a friend was using a sub par typeface (too horrible to name here) for his Terminal and coding windows, my jaw dropped, my heart sank a little, and I died a bit inside.
 
Color schemes are another thing users should be weary of. It's debatable that dark fonts on light backgrounds provide a better reading experience, but I'm a fan of the darker themes so my eyes don't start bleeding after staring at the monitor for several continuous hours.
 
So what setup are you currently rockin'? Post 'em now!
 
hot_IDE.png
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I'm rather the opposite. As long as the font is clean and easy to tell a t from an i and j, then I don't really care which font it is. I very rarely bother to change much from an editor's default settings. I think the only real non-default setting I have for my Eclipse installs across all my systems is to change the comment colour, as my Python projects were defaulting to this light grey that was overly hard to read quickly on a white background.

 

 

As for eye strain, illumination contrast does far more for it than the actual brightness or lack thereof on the screen. If you room is well lit for your screen brightness, than you are generally good, assuming your setup is laid out well so that you're not getting glare. And having at least two focal distances to work with goes a very long way toward avoiding eye strain. If you stare at a screen that is a fixed distance from yourself day in and day out, then your eyes are going to feel worse. Far better to keep moving your focus five or ten feet several times an hour. (TV or or something on the other side of the room works well, just remember to glance up at it every few minutes. Even just putting your secondary monitors such that you are looking a foot or so farther away can count for a lot at the end of the day.)

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Random internet pic:

 monokai_monodevelop.png

 I'm using monokai for C++ + everything else on VS with semantic  colorization disabled (actually enabled only for user types).

 

 

 

As for eye strain, illumination contrast does far more for it than the actual brightness or lack thereof on the screen. If you room is well lit for your screen brightness, than you are generally good, assuming your setup is laid out well so that you're not getting glare. And having at least two focal distances to work with goes a very long way toward avoiding eye strain. If you stare at a screen that is a fixed distance from yourself day in and day out, then your eyes are going to feel worse. Far better to keep moving your focus five or ten feet several times an hour. (TV or or something on the other side of the room works well, just remember to glance up at it every few minutes. Even just putting your secondary monitors such that you are looking a foot or so farther away can count for a lot at the end of the day.)

 

+1

Edited by imoogiBG
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For me, a simple layout that has all the buttons in easy to click locations. Color coding, debug, and a "run" feature are a must.

Command line editors I hate ( is this 1985 or 2014 ?! ).

 

 

 Eclipse and QT, are what I use most of the time.

Edited by Shippou
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Qt Creator, and its all been about Consolas for years now for me. I don't think I could code in another font now.

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VS 2013, dark theme. Desktop at 150% scale. I never touch the commandline. as @Shippou said: it's 2014. Not 1985.

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Code::Blocks, dark theme, colours inspired by Vi, Consolas font for all source files.

 

I use the command line a lot for things like git, makefiles, file management, or simple test projects where I can't be damned to fire up an IDE and create a project.

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VS2013 for C#. Dark theme.

Intellij Idea for Java. Also dark theme.

Sublime Text for simple scripting. Monokai dark theme.

 

For font, I use Monaco in all three. I don't use Apple's products, but this font is the best Apple has given me. :)

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VS2013 for C++.

Dark Theme with some mods.

Work with Visual Assist X ( Its a great help ), with some mods as well to the color scheme.

 

And for other files I use Notepad++, such as for HLSL shaders. smile.png

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VS, Codeblock, Eclipse, Netbeans, but I never pimp my ride, cant stand colors. Got used to coding on my black and white monitor from way back.

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I use vim for everything. I don't care for colors/fonts very much. The only thing that I need (apart from not using obvious stuff like striking red background) is clear distinction, comments not being too striking and some monospaced font.
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VS2013.  I changed the text background color to {225,225,225}, but otherwise left everything else the same as the light theme.  The slightly gray background temendously decreases eye strain.

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I don't care a big deal about font as long as it's monospace and not stylized. (I don't want to read code in Old English!) I care a lot more about the colors than the actual fonts.

 

My editor of choice is Visual Studio 2013 with the dark theme and most default settings. The only change I made was making the XML doc comments another color, and the XML tags within them very dim so when I read the comments I'm not distracted by the XML formatting. I'm a library writer so I write a lot of XML doc in order to produce a clean API reference.

 

Other IDEs I use, I don't use them nearly enough to customize them. I use Qt Creator for Linux-specific code, but I try to write code standard enough to not have to do that in the first place. I only ever use Xcode and Eclipse when writing and debugging OSX/iOS or Android specific code, otherwise I'll just write it in VS 2013 and then use a little program that will wrap the code and send it to be compiled.

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I for one do not buy into the dark background thing. I can understand why it is much more comfortable for cave dwellers. I like to work in well lit (diffused natural light, ideally) environments with bias lighting, and in those environments dark backgrounds burn the hell out of my retinas. As for other IDE customizations, I've done less and less over the years. I'm routinely working on half a dozen different machines in different operating systems and IDEs. I've learned that most of what you think you need to be productive is in your imagination. I am very fond of the productivity power tools package in VS, primarily for the badass margin/scroll:

EnhancedScrollbarVS2010.PNG

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I've always felt like the black vs white color scheme thing bordered on mythical.  I don't think I've ever felt "eye strain" before.  Is it like that tired-eye sensation you get from lack of sleep?  Is it pain?

 

As for the color scheme I use, it's usually the default for a given platform, dark or otherwise.  The only exception is that godawful default on vim where comments are dark blue on black or something asinine like that.

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I for one do not buy into the dark background thing. I can understand why it is much more comfortable for cave dwellers. I like to work in well lit (diffused natural light, ideally) environments with bias lighting, and in those environments dark backgrounds burn the hell out of my retinas.

 

Cave dwellers...

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VS2013, dark theme, VC++ pre-set config, line numbers, wide scrollbar tool-tip, custom formatting rules, dual monitor (unfortunately with very different screen size and resolution).. end.of-story.

Edited by Alessio1989
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I am very fond of the productivity power tools package in VS, primarily for the badass margin/scroll:

 

Amen, brother. That thing is great.

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VS 2013 for C++, LiteIDE for Go.. both with white backgrounds and Consolas.

Take away intellisense from me and I am a sitting duck... I can't even spell the name of the function I wrote 15 seconds ago...

command line? you are kidding right?

Edited by kunos
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Eclipse, both at home for C++ and Java and at work for PHP. Standard black on white and default font although slightly increased font size. I find it a strain to read white on black  for long periods of coding although somehow I prefer it for terminals.

 

I find the use of plain editors like Vim baffling. On a 15" text-only screen back in the day they made sense (maybe it's a laptop thing?) but I have dual HD monitors now. I want to see more status not less. Switching from DJGPP (white on blue btw biggrin.png )to Visual C++ when Windows became more widespread (around 3.11) was an amazing step forward for me personally.

Edited by danbrown
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I'm rather fond of the color scheme I came up with for PyCharm.

[url=https://flic.kr/p/o33vxk]14462971485_981b71815b_c.jpg[/url]

Took me a day and a half to find color combinations I liked. rolleyes.gif

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