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LNK2005

Unworkable project

35 posts in this topic

So I quit the job, option #3. In 3 more weeks I'll be a free (unemployed) man. The poor chap who takes over has no idea what he's getting into. I don't care. Nice guy, but I don't care. I'm going to save my own sanity, and fsck the consequences.

 

At least you stuck it out for a few months and tried to make it work.  

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Did you find another job first or are you doing that now?

I'm doing that now. Haven't found one yet. It's a risk, but I can't stay there any more.

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I've been in a similar situation at my previous job. Very nice coworkers but clueless/toxic management and the worst code base I've ever seen (Imagine a C++ code base written using only the worst possible aspects of C in the worst possible ways by an egotic self taught medical doctor who reinvented everything from strcpy to his own "database engine" which had all the referential integrity of an alzheimer patient, and it was used to manage an hospital, everything from medical records to prescriptions)

 

You did the right choice (although myself I did wait until I had a new job lined up to put in my resignation). There's no use being miserable in a job where you are the sucker stuck working on some horrible shit that management is unwilling to give the time and resources to fix.

Edited by Zlodo
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Let me guess: AMD display driver?

Nope. It' a "swiss arny knife" application that manages salaries and a shitload of other things. It's for a major tech company that I can't name because of NDA's.

 

 

I know where it is. It's thedailywtf.com isn't it! :D

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You did the right choice (although myself I did wait until I had a new job lined up to put in my resignation). There's no use being miserable in a job where you are the sucker stuck working on some horrible shit that management is unwilling to give the time and resources to fix.

Thank you. I needed to hear that.

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You could always think of it as job security... If you learn the system inside out over the next decade you would be in a position to negotiate any salary you wanted and any bonuses as they wouldn't easily be able to replace you.

Edited by braindigitalis
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You could always think of it as job security... If you learn the system inside out over the next decade you would be in a position to negotiate any salary you wanted and any bonuses as they wouldn't easily be able to replace you.

Yeah, probably, but I hate the job with a passion that can't easily be described with words. I've held good jobs before. There must be at least one available somewhere.

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You could always think of it as job security... If you learn the system inside out over the next decade you would be in a position to negotiate any salary you wanted and any bonuses as they wouldn't easily be able to replace you.

Yeah, probably, but I hate the job with a passion that can't easily be described with words. I've held good jobs before. There must be at least one available somewhere.

 

 

My job is similar in that my role is to maintain an ugly esoteric system filled with wtf. I am the only one really who knows it inside out but the difference is upper management respect my recommendations and if I choose to rewrite a part of it this is usually what happens. If you could at least get them to respect your advice, then the problem is manageable... 

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Is this a maintenance job (just keep it running) or do they expect you to constantly add features/options ontop?

 

If they expect you to do significant 'patches' into it, you may simply have to write up your assessment of the system and make recomendations and leave it upto them to either carry out proper reworking of it (== $$$), or otherwise tell them you cant do what they need under their limitations.

 

Ive done maintenance/bug fixing as part of my job after the original programmers were long gone and was able to stabilize it and add error tracking and such  (old C days when the bulk of that original code didnt even check function return codes and first thing was to add error checking logging/reporting everywhere it was like that, to actually determine what was failing to help debugging - that without changing the process logic much which took me 6 months to get a grip on to be able to do significant changes).  Of course that was probably a smaller and not such a 'rat nested' mess as what you describe.

 

ADDED :

 

Just read that you gave notice.  But to fill the time you can still write up your commentary and explain what they need to do to just start beating it into shape for its future (if it is important to their profit line and fragile enough that it WILL require changes to keep it running)

Edited by wodinoneeye
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