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      Download the Game Design and Indie Game Marketing Freebook   07/19/17

      GameDev.net and CRC Press have teamed up to bring a free ebook of content curated from top titles published by CRC Press. The freebook, Practices of Game Design & Indie Game Marketing, includes chapters from The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, and An Architectural Approach to Level Design. The GameDev.net FreeBook is relevant to game designers, developers, and those interested in learning more about the challenges in game development. We know game development can be a tough discipline and business, so we picked several chapters from CRC Press titles that we thought would be of interest to you, the GameDev.net audience, in your journey to design, develop, and market your next game. The free ebook is available through CRC Press by clicking here. The Curated Books The Art of Game Design: A Book of Lenses, Second Edition, by Jesse Schell Presents 100+ sets of questions, or different lenses, for viewing a game’s design, encompassing diverse fields such as psychology, architecture, music, film, software engineering, theme park design, mathematics, anthropology, and more. Written by one of the world's top game designers, this book describes the deepest and most fundamental principles of game design, demonstrating how tactics used in board, card, and athletic games also work in video games. It provides practical instruction on creating world-class games that will be played again and again. View it here. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing, by Joel Dreskin Marketing is an essential but too frequently overlooked or minimized component of the release plan for indie games. A Practical Guide to Indie Game Marketing provides you with the tools needed to build visibility and sell your indie games. With special focus on those developers with small budgets and limited staff and resources, this book is packed with tangible recommendations and techniques that you can put to use immediately. As a seasoned professional of the indie game arena, author Joel Dreskin gives you insight into practical, real-world experiences of marketing numerous successful games and also provides stories of the failures. View it here. An Architectural Approach to Level Design This is one of the first books to integrate architectural and spatial design theory with the field of level design. The book presents architectural techniques and theories for level designers to use in their own work. It connects architecture and level design in different ways that address the practical elements of how designers construct space and the experiential elements of how and why humans interact with this space. Throughout the text, readers learn skills for spatial layout, evoking emotion through gamespaces, and creating better levels through architectural theory. View it here. Learn more and download the ebook by clicking here. Did you know? GameDev.net and CRC Press also recently teamed up to bring GDNet+ Members up to a 20% discount on all CRC Press books. Learn more about this and other benefits here.
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yusef28

Share the most challenging problem you solved recently! What made you feel proud?

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I'm in class now so I'll share mine when I get a chance. I just think it would be cool to be able to share the problems we solve. I think it would be motivating.
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I wrote a class that acts as a double for most purposes, but it almost magically computes the gradient of any function you define, with an CPU cost that is a fixed multiple of the cost of computing the function, no matter how many partial derivatives you are computing.

 

*Woosh*  Right over my head...

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My recent achievement is getting asset hot swapping to work. Stuff like scripts, textures, data definitions, anything within a specific folder, are monitored and any modifications to these files are detected, and the file in question is reloaded. Since most of my code works with handles to these assets, the handles stay the same while the asset itself is reloaded, and everything works.

This has allowed me to do is create an ingame output console with a command prompt mode which executes any valid Lua code. This has been done completely in scripts (from logic to rendering), which means i developed the entire feature from the ground up in the matter of 2-3 hours without terminating the game at all biggrin.png

I actually had to do something similar just recently too.

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My latest most challenging problem: Not going mad while trying to release two of our games ported to Android...

 

So far, almost 100% success.

 

Still not completely released yet though...

 

Also a bit proud of my xml/C++11 UI framework that runs on our in-house engine that made the ports possible :P

Edited by Olof Hedman
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I haven't done much game development stuff, because my job as a web dev and preparation for entering college have been taking most of my time in the past few months. I couldn't find a tutorial about how to render a camera which focuses on the character for my 2D RPG, so I coded it myself with PyGame one free afternoon. I needed to store the entities' world coordinate, and calculate their screen coordinate based on the character's world coordinate. It was fun, drawing the logic on a piece of paper and wrote the code right away. It's nothing big, but I'm kinda proud about it. I still need to learn so many things. biggrin.png

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I liked the result of my work on implementing a packages system for the engine's filesystem, that supports simultaneous reading, actual file reading, and zip decompression :).

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Writing a FLAC decoder from scratch.  While not really hard in itself, figuring out details that were not mentioned in any documentation certainly was.  It was a bit trial-and-error, combined with looking at other source code of other OS-projects, and also manually decoding a stream to figure out what really goes on. 

 

Debugging the audio player for a weird 'glitch' that audio drops out for shorts amounts of times.  It happens once in a while, on a rare occasion, only to find similar behaviour on other audio applications on the same computer.  Suspecting 'app nap' feature on OS X Maverics at the moment, or even slow throughput due to hardware latency, although increasing buffer size doesn't help, and the data is still read since it 'seems' like the audio is playing just fine, except for being silent for a fraction of a second.

 

Writing a disassembler in a 'smart' way - yet seeing lots of potential for improvements.

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